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Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Vie Jul 19, 2013 10:52 am

Entrevista a Benedict en Vulture (18-7-13)

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Benedict Cumberbatch on His Emmy Nomination and Loving Matt Damon
By Jennifer Vineyard

Benedict Cumberbatch has a lot to celebrate this week. First there is his Emmy nomination for the miniseries Parade's End, which he found out about today. Then there is his birthday tomorrow, when he will turn 37. And then there is an old friend's civil wedding in Ibiza on Saturday, which he will be officiating (his first time!). "It's a very private, lovely thing to be asked to do," the actor said. "Of course, I'm going to make a joke after it, 'I do weddings. Next will be children's parties and bat mitzvahs,' if it goes well. It's a mainly Jewish and gay audience, so hopefully they will be lenient towards me." Vulture caught Cumberbatch on the phone just before his flight to Ibiza to chat about his Emmy nod, acting with his dad, and partying with his hero Matt Damon.

You can always pretend that the wedding reception you're going to be at this weekend is a joint celebration for your Emmy nomination.

Well, exactly! My friend doesn't even know this. I've been so busy trying to get luggage from one airport to another, I haven't even gotten around to telling him. I've got to call him! He's the next one to call. [Laughs.] I managed to tell my mum [Wanda Ventham] and dad [Timothy Carlton], who are over the moon, thrilled. My dad actually was in Parade's End.

Really?

He was the Westershire, the Duke of Westershire, the uncle. There's a very funny scene where we're having this picnic, and you cannot really quite tell what hurricane conditions we were acting in, because we just managed to steal a few shots between gale force winds ripping off wigs, costumes, and hats, jellies flying off the table like solidified food. It was hysterically funny. And yeah, dad's in that scene, and a couple of other scenes as well. It was pretty wonderful. I liked sharing screen time with him, and just have a day at work with him. It was a very special moment. And my dad has another connection to this: He used to date, a long time ago, he used to date Toby Jones's mum [Jennifer Heslewood]! Before Toby or his brother Rupert any of his family were a gleam in Freddie and Jenny's eyes — a long time ago, when they were young.

So your fellow nominee was a family friend, since he's up for playing Hitchcock in The Girl.

I saw Toby's career take off! I'd see him do one-man shows at Battersea, and then I just saw how brilliant he was in The Play What I Wrote, his whole career trajectory, to the shits and giggles of just being opposite each other on a plane going to the Golden Globes and now probably to the Emmys as well! It's just very exciting being nominated in the same category. We adore each other. I love his wife and his two children. I just adore his two daughters. They're very special. And he had given him advice about going to Manchester, because I was looking into university options, and he took the drama and English course at University of Manchester, and he was the one who swung it for me. And I had a great three years there, thanks to him, you know? I took his advice and ran. So we've been supporting each other and been friends for a long time, and we worked together at least twice, Creation and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. So for both of us to be in that category at the Emmys, with people who I've been inspired by for ages, [Al] Pacino, [Michael] Douglas, and in my generation, Matt Damon, who's a huge hero of mine, I'm beyond words. I'm bowled over by it, I really am. I'm so, so thrilled. What a great early birthday present!

How is Matt Damon your hero?

Well, he's just so grounded. He's so intelligent. He makes these smart choices, as an actor, as a producer, as a writer. He's so composed. You never hear a bad word said about him. Everybody loves him. And he just sounds like he's got his priorities right as a human being, and as an actor, he's phenomenal. What a screen presence. I saw Promised Land on the way to New Zealand where I was doing some more work on Smaug, the dragon in The Hobbit, and it was again, another superlative performance, the writing with John Krasinski, and just a great, great drama, setting up those arguments about the future of small-town America, and really, all small communities across the world, the crisis they face about money and income versus environmental concerns and community. It was a peaceful way of tackling it. The minute Matt and Ben [Affleck] appeared on the scene with Good Will Hunting, you knew it was a special moment. To see such young talent take the reins and create the means of work as well as star in it, and just do every one of their jobs at every level superlatively, it was very exciting. I think he's great. My biggest wish is to hang out with him!

Perhaps you'll get to do so at the Emmys. You need a guys' night out.

Yeah! I just want to get in a room with these guys and have conversations with them. I don't know what I'd say to them. I'd be a bit star struck [around Pacino and Douglas], but at least with Matt, I can kind of quiz him. And then cut to a hot night where we're all getting drunk and dancing and having a good time! Maybe it'll have to be on another occasion, but wouldn't that be cool, though? I would like to go out with that group full stop, wouldn't you? That would be a fun dinner party. I think that would be great fun.

Yeah, you could pick each other's brains, develop projects together, or not talk about work at all.

You're saying that like you can facilitate it. Do you have Matt's number? Can you pass along a message, and tell him that Benedict is a big fan and would like to hang? That would be brilliant.

Maybe you can even get him to do a cameo on Sherlock or something.

You know what? There's a part I would have loved for him to play in the third episode. He would have been amazing. But we need someone slightly older. I just got the script, and it's another early birthday present, because it is amazing. I don't want to hype it too much, because we haven't made it yet, but what a script! Steven Moffat is brilliant. I come back from Ibiza to prep for it, and so we shoot in about a week and a half's time. We shot the first two already, and then we had to break for Martin [Freeman] to do some pickups and things for The Hobbit, and for myself to do some Smaug-ing. That's all done now. So we're on Sherlock for four weeks, into early September. So it's a good time, I tell you. It's a very, very exciting time to be me. I'm really lucky. I think the plane might be taking off without me, so I have to go! [Laughs.]



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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 12:56 am

Larga entrevista en Los Angeles Times de hoy 19-7-13:

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Emmys 2013: Benedict Cumberbatch on 'Parade's End,' 'Sherlock' return

Benedict Cumberbatch got an early birthday surprise Thursday morning. Following some time in New Zealand working on the next “Hobbit” film, the British actor, who turns 37 Friday, was on his way from a “Star Trek: Into Darkness” promotional tour in Japan to a friend’s wedding in Ibiza – you know how it is -- when during a brief layover he discovered his phone had been flooded with messages.

Worried something terrible might have happened, Cumberbatch was delighted to learn he had instead had received an Emmy nomination for his performance in “Parade’s End,” the HBO/BBC miniseries adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s series of famously dense modernist novels.

“I couldn’t believe it. I thought I was hearing things,” said the actor, whose slew of upcoming projects include the highly anticipated third season of “Sherlock,” the Wikileaks movie “The Fifth Estate” and another biopic, “The Imitation Game,” about code-breaking mathematician Alan Turing.

It’s the second Emmy nomination in as many years for Cumberbatch, who is up against Al Pacino (“Phil Spector”), Toby Jones (“The Girl”), Michael Douglas and Matt Damon (both for “Behind the Candelabra”). “To be in that category, with a list of my acting heroes, is just remarkable. I’m over the moon about it,” he said. Though given his track record of late, they’re probably just as delighted to be in his company.

We talked to the actor about “Parade’s End,” the long-awaited return of “Sherlock” and his air-travel strategies.

How are you feeling?

I’m very, very good. Kind of in a state of shock.

It’s a really heavy-hitter category this year, isn’t it?

It’s proof, as if it were needed, there is a massive influx of heavyweight talent in television. We’ve been having this conversation for the last decade, pretty much -- aptly, sadly to honor Mr. Gandolfini. But since that first series announced the depth and range that television can reach, you’ve got great names that are coming to television.

I think you’re the only one in your category playing a fictional character.

I hadn’t made that distinction until you said it; I don’t know if that increases or decreases changes. I just hope I can get there because I will be in the thick of filming a real character, a most extraordinary overlooked hero of British history, Mr. Alan Turing [in the upcoming “The Imitation Game”].

You’re doing that now?

I’m about to start shooting the third episode of the third season of “Sherlock,” and after that wraps I go into prep for “The Imitation Game.” And I start shooting in September.

So I take it you’ve resolved how Sherlock will come back from the dead after his fall at the end of Season 2?

Maybe … maybe not. Maybe I’m just a haunting in Watson’s mind.

When will we get to see it?

Hopefully, by the end of the year. I’m really pushing for PBS and "Masterpiece" to broadcast it simultaneously, or at least offer some kind of streaming to people who want to watch while we broadcast it here. It seem churlish, really, to deny savvy “Sherlock” fans, who know how to break code and watch it illegally, to stop us from having an audience in America. There’s a very hungry audience of all ages. Why they should be denied the pleasure because of some odd disjuncture, I don’t know. I’m being very forceful about that and mentioning it in all the interviews. We’re aiming for the end of December or early January, but we haven’t had a date confirmed.

And you just did Julian Assange.

The trailer just came out yesterday. I’m really excited. So yeah, it’s been a hell of a year.

How long is your layover?

Not too long, and I’ve got my best friend because it’s my birthday tomorrow and he came to meet me. I’ve got to sort my luggage out now and take out the stuff I had from New Zealand. I was over there evolving Smaug [his character in “The Hobbit”] again with new material, and that’s very, very exciting. I’ve got cold weather clothes from New Zealand, and formal stuff from Japan. Now I’ve got to go through my bags to get things I need for a four-day holiday.

What’s your strategy for long flights?

I sleep, I eat to the time zone I’m going to. I’m quite a sensible traveler now. I try not to be the kid in the candy store with all the bright lights and free drinks. I’ve got scripts, the third episode of “Sherlock,” which I was reading, a very large biography on Alan Turing, and then I slept a lot. It’s not very rock 'n’ roll. It’ll be rock 'n’ roll once I get to Ibiza, but not until I get there.

Can you talk a little about your character in “Parade’s End”?

Tietjens is an inspiration himself, even though he wasn’t a real character. I think he without doubt is the character I love the most of all that I’ve played, the one I’d like to emulate in spirit and heart and soul. I absolutely adored him; I had such huge affection for him. I related to him strongly. He’s somebody I’d desperately like to live up to the standards of in real life -- an extraordinarily kind, generous, charitable, intelligent, wise, sophisticated and tasteful man who believed in meritocracy but also believed in a social order.

He just takes all the whips and scorns that the story throws at him, and he does become at times a foolish figure. I had a fat suit -- I’d just finished filming the second season of “Sherlock” so I was quite lean and mean, and this man is described as a “bulwark-walker, a meal sack of Anglican sainthood, a blond-haired rotund fat English Yorkshire gentleman, a face like a deep sea fish.” I had these things in my cheeks to expand the cheeks and jowls. It was not a hardship, to be honest. Because like I said, I felt very akin to that character and that period.

I had a deep spiritual bond with him; he got completely under my skin. It was very strange. I did feel when I was working, you really can feel the weight of ghosts on your shoulders, the history’s so rare and raw still. Even though it’s a century old now, it resonates. [World War I] was such an appalling war in such a concentrated land mass that there is something haunted about that place. I’m not superstitious, I’m not sure I believe in ghosts, but you do feel something of it.

It really struck to my core. I guess that’s when you’re able to do good work. It’s just a matter of hoping you’ve done justice to the inspiration that’s in front of you every day. This is a wonderful validation of that.

Were there particular challenges for you? The source material is not easy.

It’s incredibly detailed rich narrative in the book. The books are the most extraordinary blueprint for creating a character that an actor could ever dream of. It’s a very potent combination. It took me some persuading. I was familiar with “The Good Soldier,” which is his more widely read novel. It’s far more easily digested. The quartet that “Parade’s End” is based on are very dense, heavy books, beautiful stunning pieces of writing. For an actor, they’re fantastic, but for an adapter, they’re a nightmare. But every actor who came near [Tom Stoppard’s] script was just bowled over by its genius and depth and also its daring.

Are you a fan of the other nominated movies/miniseries?

I saw “Behind the Candelabra,” I started watching “Phil Spector” when I was going over to New Zealand. I had to stop halfway through, but he is just extraordinary, what a rich canvas. The other ones I’m just catching up with. I think Michael Douglas and Matt Damon, they always excel and they’ve always been heroes of mine. There’s massive, quite rightful sentiment for Michael because he’s back and well and he’s just turned in this career-defining performance that exceeds any expectations of the kinds of men he’s played before, and it’s just a joy to watch him in it. Matt Damon is just gold in everything he does; I adore him, I adore his subtlety, and to do something that’s out there like this. I hate the word “brave,” but hats off to them; it’s not easy to do this very full-blooded stuff.

And Soderbergh’s a genius, I’ve always wanted to work with him. Apparently he’s retired to paint, but when he gets bored he knows who to call. It’s only bittersweet for me that we can’t all win, because how you differentiate between all the performances, I don’t know. Good luck to the judges on that. I hope to God I can make it to the ceremony and meet them.

So you have you met any of them before?

Toby Jones is a wonderful, wonderful actor. I adore him, I adore his children. We’ve worked together a couple of times; we’re very old family friends. My dad dated his mum when they were very young. Whoever wins there, we’re both winning for each other, it’s very amicable between us. He’s a phenomenal actor with the most incredible range, and someone I’ve always looked up to and asked advice from when I went to Manchester University. I kind of went there because of him, so I owe him a lot. I’d be thrilled to see him lift it above his head.

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 5:09 am

jajajjajajja y se creera que solo los americanos , saben saltarse las "normas" para verlo antes de tiempo jajaj Wink , que poco nos conoces todavia a nosotras Laughing Laughing Laughing , y con lo poco que se cambia , la de equipaje que tenia que llevar esta vez , seguro que estar aqui le estara encantando jajajajajjaja claro ahora entiendo lo de ponerse aller la chaqueta cuando llego , si es que ya no se acordaria que aqui es verano Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing , me parto con la estrategia de viaje si es que ete hombre es la caña, y me acabo de dar cuenta de , una cosa , cuanto mas dinero tiene alguien mas le gustan las cosas gratis jajajajajajajajajaj, pero huy huy huy que Ben quiere rock 'n' roll cuando este en ibiza , que se agarren cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers  jajjajjaja , eso si Ben a encontrado al amor de su vida tijens que obsesion por dioss Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  con lo aburrido que es Neutral Neutral  , de verdad no le encuentro el chiste confused confused confused , y es que hasta va a creer en fantasma:roll: Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 6:18 am

Ay, ya se que suena raro igual, pero a mi me encanta que piense eso del personaje de Christopher Tietjens. Me hace creer que por lo menos en algo pensamos igual y me hace feliz.
Ya lo he comentado en alguna ocasion, yo me he enamorado de ese libro y de ese personaje, aunque os cueste creerlo segun lo leia tuve momentos de empatia con el y entiendo lo que Ben dice acerca del personaje.
Se ha convertido en uno de los libros que mas me ha llenado leyendo, me hizo sentir muchas cosas y me las hizo sentir precisamente Christopher, no los personajes femeninos, asi que encantada de la vida con lo que Ben dice, me acerca un poquito a el.
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 9:22 am

Haber luly, si no te importa me podrias explicar un poco por que os gusta tanto ese personaje, es que yo por ahora voy muy por el principio , y me parece un tio bastante aburrido , estirado , antiguo, como que la gente normal , es menos que el y que los que no tienen su inteligencia como que se les puede hablar , pero ... tampoco le es muy relevante, no se lo mismo he entendido todo lo contrario , por eso digo si me puedes explicar , ( hija aqui una que es un poco cortita Embarassed Razz ) , es que por ejemplo , la muchacha joven me parece mas simple que un lapiz eso si con muy mala os**a, y sin embargo silvia me parece una tia super inteligente , eso es algo que tampoco comprendo estoy muy perdida😕 confused confused 

( me doy verguencita yo misma Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed )
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Pandora10 el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 9:47 am

Isa88 escribió:Haber luly, si no te importa me podrias explicar un poco por que os gusta tanto ese personaje, es que yo por ahora voy muy por el principio , y me parece un tio bastante aburrido , estirado , antiguo, como que la gente normal , es menos que el y que los que no tienen su inteligencia como que se les puede hablar , pero ... tampoco le es muy relevante, no se lo mismo he entendido todo lo contrario , por eso digo si me puedes explicar , ( hija aqui una que es un poco cortita Embarassed Razz ) , es que por ejemplo , la muchacha joven me parece mas simple que un lapiz eso si con muy mala os**a, y sin embargo silvia me parece una tia super inteligente , eso es algo que tampoco comprendo estoy muy perdida😕 confused confused 

( me doy verguencita yo misma Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed )

Nada de vergüenza Isa, el foro está dividido entre las que adoran a Tietjens y las que le daríamos un coscorrón por lento... es lo que hay. Lo que tú acabas de comentar está posteado en un hilo que se abrió sobre la serie, si lo buscas verás que allí cada cual tiene una opinión diferente, igual así te haces más a la idea. Very Happy
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Sáb Jul 20, 2013 9:36 pm

Isa amor, en cuanto tenga un rato te explico en el otro post lo que pienso, pero es lo que dice Pandora no tiene por que gustarte, el tema de los libros es algo totalmente subjetivo. En cuanto a las mujeres de la historia, totalmente de acuerdo contigo, a mi no me gusta ninguna de las dos, son dos extremos de mujer con los que resulta muy dificil identificarse.
Lo dicho en cuanto pueda me extiendo en el post de Parade's encantada porque me gusta mucho hablar de este libro
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Vie Jul 26, 2013 10:18 pm

Aprovechando que The Times ha liberado su sección online de pago (no sé si por error o voluntariamente), en Twitter recomiendan 2 entrevistas de Caitlin Moran a nuestro Benedict. Una es la de mayo de 2013 de cuando Caitlin fue a entrevistarlo a casa de sus padres y se metió por equivocación en el terreno de la casa de Kate Moss (que ya puse en su dá por aquí). La otra es de 2011, es la que voy a poner ahora.

(Caitlin Moran es la que publicó el libro Benedict Cumberbatch in Transition, y al parecer es una gran admiradora suya).

Fuente: [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Caitlin Moran: my love affair with Sherlock

Caitlin Moran meets unlikely pin-up Benedict Cumberbatch, the new Sherlock Holmes, at 221B Baker Street (by wa ay of a hangar in Wales)

July 2010. It is three weeks before the first series of Sherlock broadcasts on BBC One, and show creators Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss are panicking. The BBC has suddenly brought forward the slot for their show “by a substantial amount”. As summer is already a difficult time to launch a series, Gatiss and Moffat are bewildered as to how they will promote it.

“We were sitting around with our heads in our hands,” Steven Moffat remembers, “going, ‘There isn’t enough time to do this. It will broadcast to no one.’ ”

This was when they joined Twitter.

“It was really only one step up from individually knocking on people’s doors and shouting, ‘Sherlock is coming!’ through their letter boxes,” Mark Gatiss explains. “We were almost… desperate.”

“What did we think we’d get?” Moffat muses.

“Four million viewers,” Gatiss replies.

“Four million viewers, tops, and a couple of nice broadsheet write-ups. That was our best-case scenario.”

On the night the debut episode – A Study in Pink – went out, the core cast and crew assembled at Moffat’s house in Kew to watch it, in a state of nervous tension.

Gathering around the wine – “a lot of wine” – were Martin Freeman (Dr Watson), Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock Holmes), Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat and Sue Vertue, the show’s producer, who is, handily, also married to Moffat, “which has, over the years, saved us a fortune on cabs”.

In the event, when Sherlock began, the Moffat party had to immediately pause it, as Benedict Cumberbatch still hadn’t arrived.

“He called us – he was stuck in a traffic jam on Baker Street,” Moffat recalls. “Sherlock Holmes, stuck on Baker Street! We couldn’t work out if that was a good sign or not.”

“I think he might have made that up, to be honest,” Gatiss says. “But it’s a really good lie.”

When Cumberbatch finally arrived, the party who made Sherlock watched the show ten minutes behind the rest of Britain.

“But we knew when the climax happened,” Gatiss beams, “because suddenly all our phones were going off, everyone texting, everyone phoning. I mean, exploding.”

“An hour later, I went and sat in the garden,” Moffat says, “and looked at Twitter. I saw that Benedict was trending worldwide on Twitter, Martin was trending worldwide, Sherlock itself was trending worldwide. And people were talking about it with this… passion. As if they were lifelong fans – when, of course, they’d not seen it 90 minutes ago. Everything had changed in 90 minutes.”

He pauses for a minute, still looking surprised.

“Everything.”

••••••••••

July 2011. A shabby-looking rehearsal room in Central London. This is the first read-through for the first episode – titled A Scandal in Belgravia – of the second series of Sherlock. Almost a year to the day of its first broadcast, it is now the most anticipated show of 2012.

For a Sherlock fan, it is impossibly exciting to be here. A table bears a huge pile of pristine, freshly printed scripts – each full of mysteries, corpses, grandiloquent scene-setting and bullet-train dialogue.

To the left, Mark Gatiss – who not only writes Sherlock, but also stars as Sherlock’s upright older brother, Mycroft – sips tea. To the right is Watson (Martin Freeman), eating a banana. I go to the toilet and, while washing my hands, express my joy at being in a building which will soon see the arrival of Mrs Hudson, played by Una Stubbs.

“Who’s talking about meeeeee?” says the unmistakable voice of Una Stubbs from the next cubicle.

Since the broadcast of the first series of Sherlock – for which Gatiss and Moffat nervously prayed for 4 million viewers – the show has racked up a devoted 9.2 million viewers, won two Baftas and Best Terrestrial Show at the Edinburgh television festival, been nominated for Emmys and promoted a slew of think-pieces about how it had single-handedly made Sunday night TV “the new Friday night”. Sales of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s books went up 180 per cent in the same month, and Belstaff – designer of the “instantly iconic” greatcoat Holmes wears in the show – had to put the previously discontinued design back into manufacture. At one point, the waiting list for the £900 coat was six months long.

Most notable of all, however, it made an overnight star of its Holmes, Benedict Cumberbatch. Previously the kind of well-respected theatre actor who popped up in award-winning thinky dramas on BBC Two, Cumberbatch – with his clay-white skin, sexy-sloth face and pub-time jaguar growl – became instant pin-up totty; eventually going on to become GQ magazine’s “Man of the Year”, and be hailed by Steven Spielberg – who then cast him in his forthcoming War Horse – as “the greatest onscreen Holmes”. Sherlock has changed Cumberbatch’s life.

Entering the room today, the discrepancy between Cumberbatch and Cumberbatch-as-Sherlock is notable. Holmes would enter the room in a swirl of greatcoat, rattle off some nail-gun comment, analyse the contents of the biscuit tin to deduce that it’s someone’s birthday, then go into a high-grade petulant intellectual sulk.

Cumberbatch himself, on the other hand, is wearing a faded band T-shirt, and exudes the air of an indie kid in his late teens or early twenties. He’s bright and enthusiastic and friendly – his is the air of someone who helps mums carry buggies up stairs.

When the read-through starts, however, this gonky teenager disappears, and he slips, effortlessly, into the stiff-backed, cold-eyed, Pentium 20 brain of Holmes. His delivery can still the room – even in his T-shirt, in this bright summer sunshine. Spielberg was not wrong.

When the read-through ends, everyone claps.

“I love that we’ve all applauded ourselves spontaneously at the end,” Moffat says, drily. “Well done all of us. Now we’ve just got to make the damn thing. Better than the last series. No pressure. Off you go.”

Out on the street, Cumberbatch is fiddling with his phone. Tomorrow is his birthday: “And I can’t get a restaurant reservation,” he says, mournfully. “They won’t call me back. I should have said my name was Sherlock Holmes.” He squints down the street. “I guess I’ll just have to… have a picnic.”

It is a uniquely dolorous delivery of the word “picnic”.

**********

Early August, 2011. We are in 221b Baker Street. It is raining outside, hard.

Inside 221b, however, it is cosy – Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat are lolling in the armchairs of Holmes and Watson, looking perfectly at home.

We’re not really in 221b Baker Street, of course – this is the set, in a hangar in Wales. After a few minutes, someone outside turns off the rain – it’s just a hose, pointing at the window.

“Come and look around,” Gatiss says, springing up from his chair.

Seeing Moffat and Gatiss here, in domestic repose – giving the impression of being a Holmes-loving Bert and Ernie – seems very fitting. Much of Sherlock’s potency comes from reconfiguring the friendship between Holmes and Watson – Freeman’s Watson is more than equal to Holmes. Yes, Watson’s there as a dragon tamer, to whack Sherlock with a stick when he starts monstering around, or climbing up on the furniture. But it’s also Watson who misses active service; Watson with the gun. Holmes and Watson cry, “The game is on!” from different motives, but with equal delight.

And it is the joy of the game that binds Moffat and Gatiss, too. When they were both working on Doctor Who – Moffat runs the show, Gatiss is a guest scriptwriter – they would while away the long train journeys from London to Cardiff by talking about their favourite Holmes books and films. Today, they quote classic lines to each other, tripping over each other to be the first to finish. This steeping in the canon is what powers Sherlock’s astonishing pace and zip: Moffat and Gatiss abstract the existing Sherlock movies and books with the extravagance and hook-hungry eye of hip-hop producers ripping beats. Their Sherlock is like some turbo-charged, bass-heavy, super-smart mash-up of all that has gone before.

Their delight in the show’s set is palpable. They fly around showing off Holmes’s collection of 240 different kinds of tobacco ash, Holmes’s bust of Goethe. In this series, we see Holmes’s bedroom for the first time – I note it has an en suite bathroom, and is very tidy. (“Holmes is the kind of flatmate who would keep his room tidy by throwing all his mess out into the front room,” Moffat notes.)

I bounce on the bed a bit. I feel I owe all of womankind this action. I refrain from sniffing the pillowcase. That feels undignified.

The level of nerd-detail is high: there are 17 steps up from the hall to the front room, as specified in the books. The Christmas cards in the hallway have all been filled out inside, to the landlady, Mrs Hudson. On the set, however, there are no actual quarters for Mrs Hudson.

“She doesn’t have a room,” Gatiss explains. “She just… stands at the end of this corridor, and hibernates until the front door bell rings.”

It’s interesting that – given this level of obsession with Holmes – Gatiss and Moffat found one aspect of their Holmes wholly mysterious until very late in the process.

“We didn’t know if he was gay or not until the [first] series had actually finished, did we?” Gatiss muses. “We kind of had to… work it out. It wasn’t obvious.” You don’t say.

**********

Wander outside, and you find Benedict Cumberbatch, in all his Holmesian glory, sitting at a picnic table, smoking a fag. Today is a good day for Cumberbatch, he reflects,

as he sips from a polystyrene cup of coffee marked “Benedict”. (“I try to get them to write ‘Sir Benedict’ on it. Occasionally they oblige.”)

Yesterday, however, was a bad day. Holmes’s trademark, tack-tack-tack-tack monologues are one of the most high-profile, technically arduous tricks in the business – as Holmes’s extraordinary deductive skills are presented as “a superpower – an achievable superpower”, the deductive monologues are the bits where Cumberbatch has to, essentially, pull on Holmes’s underpants over his tights and fly. He has to look like the cleverest man who ever lived.

“I had a non-stop monologue and I just… fell off the edge of the cliff,” Cumberbatch says, sighing. “I couldn’t remember all the words. I just… stopped. It’s horrible. Sometimes it feels like, rather than acting, you’re being a machine. I don’t mean that in a negative way. Holmes is just very… still. Still but fast.”

Cumberbatch isn’t one for dwelling or moaning, though: today is a better day, and he’s pretty sure he won’t get a Retrafta.

A Retrafta? “It’s something Martin and I made up. Where you act so badly, they come and take your Bafta off you.”

On set, they turn the hoses back on. It starts raining again on Baker Street. Cumberbatch tamps out his cigarette, and, about halfway between picnic table and sound stage, starts walking like Sherlock Holmes again.

**********

Late August, 2011. Battersea Power Station.More than 50 crew members, actors and sundry personnel are gathered on a location shoot. Ostensibly, they are here because the dilapidated early 20th-century grandeur of the power station – with its glowing walnut parquet floors, 20ft windows and rows of clockwork chrome dials – makes one of the most exquisite TV location-shoot interiors in Britain.

In reality, however, it’s hard to shake the suspicion everyone’s here because Moffat and Gatiss could not resist the lure of a single one-liner: summoned to Battersea by Mycroft, Watson notes, drily, “He’s got a power complex.”

Standing outside a location trailer is Martin Freeman. He is notably not wearing the safety helmets that are mandatory for everyone else on set, and is in the middle of explaining to one of the Sherlock runners – who is wearing her safety helmet – just why this is.

“I’m a big fish, you see, love,” he says, sipping at his tea. “I’m… Johnny Big Bollocks. And you’re… you’re… what’s that stuff whales eat? Krill. You’re krill. Location krill. Krill wears a helmet.”

Freeman is on very good form today. Incredibly funny and incredibly filthy, he makes a comment about Una Stubbs that it would be inappropriate to repeat in The Times. (“I’ve been flirting with Una,” he concludes, after the bad story. “Well, it’s actually sexual aggression, but I often find the line between the two quite blurry.”)

This season of Sherlock has been scheduled around Freeman’s Watson. Having committed to a second series of Sherlock, Freeman was then offered the role of Bilbo Baggins in Peter Jackson’s forthcoming, multimillion-dollar, two-film version of The Hobbit. A man of honour, Freeman had to – agonisingly – turn down The Hobbit, only for Jackson to declare that Freeman was the only man for the job and shift the entire, gigantic production schedule around him.

This time next year, after the release of The Hobbit: an Unexpected Journey, Freeman will be one of the most recognisable men on the planet. In the meantime, it typifies Sherlock’s embarrassment of riches that he’s sitting in a car park in Battersea, drinking tea and waiting to play Dr Watson.

“This is harder than The Hobbit,” he says. “That’s a half-a-billion dollar operation. The way they look after you is… nuts, really. I mentioned that I’d seen this gig with these two great DJs, doing Northern Soul, then a couple of weeks later, I go into the lunch tent, and they’d got these two blokes with their turntables, with their speakers and a bit of lino, so they could do their Northern Soul turns. Just for me. It’s a weird thing being incredibly grateful while you’re eating your lunch, stone-cold sober, in what is essentially a nightclub.”

Freeman does Sherlock because he loves it. He regards Cumberbatch incredibly highly: “He’s sweet and generous in an almost childlike way. He’s very easy to screw over. I could take advantage of him playing cards. Actually, I must take advantage of him playing cards. But as an actor, he’s one of the very few people I’ve worked with whose taste I don’t question. Even subconsciously I’m not going, ‘Well, I wouldn’t have done it like that.’ He commits.”

Freeman is called out for a shot. I wander over to Cumberbatch’s trailer. He’s dressed as Sherlock, and looks a bit bored.

“Is my eye spasming?” he says. “I can feel it spasming. Is it spasming? Look! Look! It’s doing it now.”

I can see nothing.

“I’ve never been this near a power station before,” he frets.

“It’s been decommissioned since 1983,” I remind him.

Cumberbatch pretends to dislike Freeman. “He’s always doing kung fu on me,” he says, mock-peevishly. “We’ll be standing around, and I won’t be paying any attention to him, and then he suddenly goes, ‘HYYYMMNNNN’ and his hand is right next to my windpipe.” He pauses. “On the other hand, before now he’s asked to have jokes for Watson taken out of the script, because he says it’s taking the attention away from me doing Holmes. He’ll be doing some subtle, Mike Leigh thing, and I’ll be… the posh talkative one with the flouncy coat.”

Cumberbatch goes on to talk about how Sherlock’s overnight success has changed his life. “In my career, I hadn’t really made myself a target [for the media]. I had played Stephen Hawking, Van Gogh, William Pitt the Younger, Frankenstein… and now…” he sighs, and tries to think of an example.

“One woman came up to me,” he says, eventually, “and asked me about my favourite cheese. I told her which one – how you chisel away so you can get a little shard that tastes so good, because you’ve worked so hard for it. Then she said, ‘Can you draw the cheese?’ and I’m afraid I said no. You know,” he says, both despairingly and indignantly, “it’s really difficult to draw cheese.”

We then move on to what I think is the most devastating revelation I’ve ever got from an interview subject: Cumberbatch does not like his Sherlock hair.

“I was short and blonde in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and I really, really didn’t like coming back to this hair for this second series. I can’t think of a wittier or even accurate comparison, but I just think it makes me look a bit like… a woman.”

••••••••••

November 2011. Air Studios, Hampstead. As part and parcel of the lavishness of Sherlock, it has a proper score – written by the Grammy Award-winning Bond soundtrack composer, David Arnold, and Michael Price.

I walk in just as the orchestra is syncing to the emotional denouement of the episode. Benedict’s face looms, huge and pale, on the screens; the piano and strings fall like sad rain. Sherlock’s own violin motif rises and falls, like a bird dying of heartbreak. It’s impossibly affecting. You just don’t get this on Midsomer Murders.

Arnold – a man of martini-dry humour – composed Sherlock’s theme tune, too.

“If you look at the score to the theme tune,” he says, in his rumbly murmur, “the notes spell out ‘SHERLOCK’.”

“Really?” I ask.

“No, you tit,” he replies. “That’s Morse.”

Between takes, all the talk is of the forthcoming Sherlock premiere, at the British Film Institute, London. It is becoming an increasingly big deal – the blogosphere is in a state of mild hysteria about it.

“There are tickets being touted for £350 on eBay,” David Arnold says. “£350.” He pauses. “If I can get them up to £500, I’m having a skiing holiday. And I can’t even ski.”

**********

December 2011. The Sherlock premiere at the BFI. Dedicated Sherlock fans have been camping outside the BFI since 5.30am, in the bitter cold, hoping for returns.

It’s now 5pm, and BFI staff have let them inside, where the 50 most dedicated clutch cameras and presents for the cast. Well, Cumberbatch, really. They’re all here for Cumberbatch. When he walks into the room, there is proper fan-girl screaming – followed by low, communal moans over his beauty. You don’t usually get this for stars of classy BBC Sunday night dramas.

Sitting on a bench, observing all the pandemonium, is a slight figure in a woolly hat. On closer inspection, it becomes apparent it’s Una Stubbs.

“Why aren’t you in the green room with the rest of the cast?” I ask her. “Oh, I don’t want to make a fuss,” she says, cheerfully.

In the cinema, there are whoops and screams as Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat and Benedict Cumberbatch enter and take their seats. The opening credits to A Scandal in Belgravia begin in a room full of love and excitement – but what you notice, as you watch it, is how much more love and excitement there is on the screen.

However much the fans of Sherlock love Sherlock, it is dwarfed by the passion and obsession of the people who actually make it. On a tiny BBC budget, on schedules that nearly broke everybody, the new series of Sherlock looks like a love affair with possibility and ambition: visually dazzling and vibrating with unexpected neural leaps, it spends half its time being the funniest show on TV, and then casually cracks your heart, right across the centre. And, oh, the sheer brightness. I have seen audiences clap for things that move them, or make them laugh – but this is the first time I have ever seen a plot-point so clever and unexpected that it prompts a whole room to applaud it.

Sherlock’s instant eminence, the first time it broadcast, seems obvious: it does only take 90 minutes for everything to change when you’re moving this fast. This kind of velocity is inarguable.

Three minutes in, Mark Gatiss leans over to Steven Moffat and whispers something. Moffat starts to laugh – and then looks quite sombre.

Afterwards, in the bar, I ask Moffat what Gatiss said. “That it’s never going to get any better than this,” he replies. “I started to laugh, because I thought it was a joke – and then I realised he was right. It probably won’t get any better than this.”

He pauses.

“Until we write the next series, obviously.” He looks down into his wine. “That’s going to be amazing.”

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Jul 27, 2013 1:23 am

Muchas gracias por subir las entrevistas , me acuerdo lo que nos reimos con la segunda que deciamos que Ben era hipocondriaco y que si lo conociamos le ibamos a decir que le veiamos unas manchitas sospechosas Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing 

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Sáb Jul 27, 2013 9:34 pm

Nenas os dejo el enlace de un articulo de Cinemania en el que aclara un poco que pintaba la Trosky en Ibiza.
Era la madrina de uno de los novios, aunque aqui dice que es la PAREJA DE BEN!!!!!!!!
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Jajajajaja!!!!!! Seguimos con la intriga....
Sherlock te necesitamos!!!, esto se nos escapa al entendimiento.
A mi que me expliquen como te puedes ordenar pastor a traves de internet, surrealista todo, me parece que alguien ha desayunado setas alucinogenas..... o yo soy muy panoli
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Jul 27, 2013 11:47 pm

lulyve escribió:Nenas os dejo el enlace de un articulo de Cinemania en el que aclara un poco que pintaba la Trosky en Ibiza.
Era la madrina de uno de los novios, aunque aqui dice que es la PAREJA DE BEN!!!!!!!!
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Jajajajaja!!!!!! Seguimos con la intriga....
Sherlock te necesitamos!!!, esto se nos escapa al entendimiento.
A mi que me expliquen como te puedes ordenar pastor a traves de internet, surrealista todo, me parece que alguien ha desayunado setas alucinogenas..... o yo soy muy panoli

lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! 

me parto , es verdad que te puedes ordenar pastor por internet, pero en yankilandia asi que aqui como que no pinta nada y en inglaterra menos Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes , pero bueno ya sabemos que ha Ben le gusta mas estas cosas que a un tonto un boli Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes , aunque no se ... la verdad por que las palabras de: molar mas , colegas , parecen mas palabras de unos tios hablando que de una "revista de cine" pero bueno.... , y es normal que hayan dicho que la trosky es su churry , haber , el soltero ella soltera pues lo unen y punto , no creo que por nada mas , tambien dijeron que babeaba por la americana y el "noviazgo" Rolling Eyes  le duro lo que duro el rodaje asi que..Rolling Eyes , ademas , cuantas madrinas se tienen en englan confused  es que la frase es la madrina de uno de los novios me ha dejado descolocada , asi que yo le doy mas posivilidades a el resumen de una entrevista que ha puesto nika , en el cumberland , que viene a decir que esta feliz viviendo la vida loca y que las chrurrys con tiempo si eso jajaja, el Bene se nos a convertido en un cabroncete jajajaja , esta recuperando la juventud perdida, claro ayer me dio por hacer cuentas Embarassed Laughing  y empezo con la pollo, a los 22!!! osea que ahora esta desatado, y ahora despues de este off topicazo Embarassed Embarassed , una pregunta: protestante el la religion de los "ingleses"? es que no lo se de verdad jajajajajajaja Embarassed Razz , no es que me inporte , pero como este hombre a dado tanto ruido con la cumberpalanca y su religion , pues ya es simple curiosidad Razz Razz
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Dom Jul 28, 2013 6:16 am

Mirad lo que ha puesto The Sun referente a la boda:D 
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 Os dejo el enlace de la página,que se vé muy mal:
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 Ayyyyyyyyyy,que ha dicho que han firmado para 2 temporadas más.ya sé que esto es de Sun,pero quiero creerlos por esta vez:face:
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Jul 28, 2013 10:17 am

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Adoro a este hombre I love you I love you I love you , ojala sea verdad ,a si veremos que aunque se le haya subido un poco en la vida personal Rolling Eyes , en la profesional no y tener a Sherlock por mucho tiempo, hayyy mi hurraquita , que le encanta coguer todos los trabajos ( ya lo veo protegiendo el tesoro cual smaug ) Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Razz
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Vie Sep 13, 2013 12:31 am

Artículo en Cineplex Movie Blog de ayer 11-9-13 compilando todas las cosas importantes que Benedict dijo durante el TIFF de Toronto:

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INTERVIEW: Benedict Cumberbatch on Assange, Meryl and those pesky Star Wars rumours
By Emma Badame

This year's TIFF Festival has a number of big name stars pulling double or even triple duty on the red carpet, traveling to the Big Smoke as part of the annual ten-day long fest dedicated to all things new and cinematic. But the guy attracting the biggest crowds, with the most vocal and devoted fans (see above), a certain actor named Cumberbatch. Benedict Cumberbatch.

The 37 year-old British thesp was one of the first A-listers to touch down in Toronto late last week, just in time to hit the world premiere of his brand new drama, The Fifth Estate, at Roy Thompson Hall. The film sees Cumberbatch star as Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in director Bill Condon's look at the friendship between Assange and colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruhl).

We had the opportunity to sit down with the (ever-so-stylish) man of the hour -- who happens to star in four movies this fall, including the three TIFF headliners 12 Years A Slave, August: Osage County and the aforementioned Fifth Estate -- at the Ritz Carlton this past Saturday afternoon to address the complexities of Julian Assange, his awe of Meryl Streep and those pesky Star Wars VII rumours.

Read on for what he had to say on:

His busy year:

"I apparently had ten days off in the summer but they went by in a bit of a blur. It’s been a very, very busy year but it’s an embarrassment of riches, so I’m loathed to complain about it. I’m just really enjoying it and as my erstwhile character Sherlock says, a new job is as good as a change - or a change is as good as a rest even. I think that’s what he says. He says it in 'The Sign of Four' so you can go look it up and see how badly I misquote him, never mind behave like him. So yeah, it’s been an amazing time. It is an amazing time right at the moment and I’m really enjoying it."

Assange's unique look:

"I quite liked having a kind of a skunky badger thing with the white [dyed hair] and my normal sort of darker hair on top. I did love the fact that for about six months last year -- both in August: Osage County and in 12 Years A Slave -- I had my own colour hair, which was great. But I really, really quite enjoyed it -- putting the wig on.

The first time I put it on and came into the room, people were wowed. That’s a great thrill when you realise something’s working.

I think he’s probably got softer features than me though. I’m a little more angular, which sometimes makes me look a little weird and creepy in some of the wigs and that’s not the intention at all, that’s just the way I look. We weren’t trying to do that, it’s just the different bone structure. I’ve got a longer face, he’s got a rounder face.

The harder thing was the contact lenses, I’ve never worn them before. I’ve got kind of light aquamarine, green-y kinda things. My eyes change depending on whichever light is stronger, whichever colour is stronger. Mine are lighter, that’s the thing - much much lighter than his. And in certain lights his are a really rich, deep blue and in other lights they’re a kind of slate-y grey or dark and so I wanted to tone my eyes down a little bit.

Assange requesting he not make the film:

"It mattered to me a lot that [Assange] felt so passionately but I wanted to persuade him that it wasn’t necessarily going to be as bad as he feared it would be, which was based on a script he'd had leaked to him -- a very old draft that I don’t think I even ever saw."

His portrayal of the WikiLeaks founder:

"It was important to me to portray him as a three-dimensional human being and not get into a slagging match about whether he was good or bad. I wanted to portray the human characteristics of a man at the forefront of an incredible media revolution with incredible ideas whose controversy was borne out of that, primarily, and not get bogged down in character assassination, which is so easy to come by because people want a headline. They want to grab something and run with a two-dimensional story. I like the way the film tackles that -- the way Julian talks about his appraisal in The New York Times as giving equal billing to the state of his socks as to the collateral murder -- it kind of highlights that idiocy. So it was important to me to portray him in a balanced way.

It was important to also concentrate on what we were doing, which was a film -- a dramatization of events. So while [all the source material on Julian] was informative, it was important for me to always remember that this is a perspective, not the perspective. I think the film’s central message is there’s no such thing as objective truth. It’s always going to be a bit of a personal truth and you have to, I think, take inspiration from the film in that way as it is about people journalism. It’s about something that’s powered by individuals, it’s not about a consensus. I think that’s probably how the film will be greeted and reacted to and that’s no bad thing."

On the importance of showing the audience another side of Assange:

"I think the banner headline -- the perception of him -- in a tabloid sense is very two-dimensional. The character assassinations came hot on the foot of shifting perspectives and everything that went on in the time of the leaks. So anything that fleshes out who he is as a three-dimensional human being is to his benefit. God knows what he’ll think of that but, as an audience, I think you can understand more of someone when they are part of something that’s universal to all of us. Though I think it’s very clear that he doesn’t want the message confused with the messenger. And that’s happened. We obsess about that in culture all the time. We can’t just take an actor’s work, we need to know everything of their personality. We can’t just take a politician’s stance, we need to know what it is that relates to us. I’m not saying whether that’s good or bad but I think it’s an extraordinary thing."

On Assange and Daniel Domscheit-Berg's relationship:

"I think it’s really complicated and for those two to disseminate, not me as an actor outside of it. In a moment of drama, you have empathy for your character so I see [Julian's] perspective as strongly as now, as an audience, I can see both perspectives. It’s a very complex relationship and two very complex characters. Daniel’s no stooge. He’s not a follower, he’s a smart guy. He’s an activist and he’s incredibly pragmatic. He’s not some kind of blind acolyte. But I think Julian has a magnetic hold over people and I think he’s an incredible spokesperson for an extraordinary idea that was borne out of his realization of it. And he has very complex relationships with people because of that."

His role in August: Osage County:

"I play Little Charles, who’s this adorable, really lost soul who’s trying to find a place in a world that cuts him out. He’s in love with someone who’s very close to him, but it has to remain a secret and it kind of tears him apart. He’s constantly belittled by a destructively loving and protective mother because of a secret surrounding who he really is. He’s a pretty tragic figure but rather a beautiful soul. He’s an alright singer and songwriter too. I do sing and play the piano in it."

Working with Meryl Streep in August:

"I loved that job. I mean I loved, loved the play and when I heard they were doing it, I thought: "I’ve got to audition! I’d kill to play that part!" Are you kidding me? To sit around that table and watch Meryl? I mean, we were all of us in awe. It’s an amazing table to sit ‘round anyway but we kind of forgot to act in character because we just sat there as an audience. She’s astonishing. Working with her was very, very inspiring. I know every actor says that that works with her but it’s a trip, an absolute trip."

Acting advice from Meryl:

"I was about to do Assange and I asked her, “Where do I start?” I mean, obviously I’m not Australian, I don’t have the same speech patterns as him. His way of holding himself, his gestures - all that sort of thing. And she was just giving this incredible tour de force [on set]. She was playing someone with esophageal cancer, who’s high on drugs, on downers, getting drunk at her husband’s wake and she's turning vulnerable into attack into lost into knowing into sexy, vampy -- the gear shifts were sublime. And I just wondered how she was playing this orchestra of a performance. So I asked, “Chicken and egg, cart and horse? What gives?” She said, “I don’t really know. How about you?” And I went “Well, thank f**k for that!” because I don’t have a method. I wasn’t schooled in a method, necessarily. I mean I’ve got tools I carry around very gratefully from my time at drama school and also what I’ve learned working with people like Meryl and great directors like Bill [Condon], Danny Boyle and Tomas Alfredson. I’ve been so spoiled by the roster of talent I’ve worked with. So we agreed that if you have just one approach to it, it limits what you can do and what other people can do with you. So it was reassuring. Really reassuring for me. It was a really nice moment."

That name for his fans:

"They’re actually changing their name - well most of them -- to CumberCollective. They’ve gone down the route of reversing the negative backlash of however many years of feminism. I didn’t ask for this subservient, demeaning collective noun and they’ve very kindly gone, “Oh no, it was only a joke!” Best to make a slightly more politically correct joke about it in my name though! But it’s one of the least offensive names I’ve got on the internet. If you care to Google it, there’s all sorts of nonsense but I’ve had that since school so I’ve got quite a thick skin about that."

The Star Wars VII rumour:

"No. No offer. It’s all rumour and it’s all gossip. No one’s been offered anything other than the people we know have been offered a part. Would I like to do it? I’ve said many times that of course I would. But J.J.’s worked with me before, so he knows where I live. It’s all up to the boss."

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Sáb Sep 14, 2013 1:09 am

Dejo otra entrevista, que en realidad no dice mucho nuevo, es casi repetir lo que ya hemos leído en las anteriores, salvo por un detalle, hay un momento de la entrevista en la que no tienes claro quién está entrevistando a quién. El entrevistado (Ben), se convierte en entrevistador y por las respuestas yo diría que el periodista se quedó un poco Shocked Shocked Shocked  ¿Pero no era yo el que preguntaba? Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
En general a mi me ha resultado interesante  


"Here is the interview with BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH from the Toronto international film festival. He sat down and talked about his upcoming film THE FIFTH ESTATE and so much more.


Triggering our age of high-stakes secrecy, explosive news leaks and the trafficking of classified information, WikiLeaks forever changed the game. Now, in a dramatic thriller based on real events, “The Fifth Estate” reveals the quest to expose the deceptions and corruptions of power that turned an Internet upstart into the 21st century’s most fiercely debated organization. The story begins as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl) team up to become underground watchdogs of the privileged and powerful. On a shoestring, they create a platform that allows whistleblowers to anonymously leak covert data, shining a light on the dark recesses of government secrets and corporate crimes. Soon, they are breaking more hard news than the world’s most legendary media organizations combined. But when Assange and Berg gain access to the biggest trove of confidential intelligence documents in U.S. history, they battle each other and a defining question of our time: what are the costs of keeping secrets in a free society—and what are the costs of exposing them?"



PRESS: So, Benedict, we heard you were described by Daniel as a real Sherlock. He would see you in the morning, you would sit there and say all of these things you managed to observe that were totally accurate. So you’ve taken the role to heart or the role was just something that was inevitable in your life because you are Sherlock Holmes.


BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: He’s very flattering, but no, I’m a far way off his brilliance.

PRESS: Okay. And you’ve got so much this fall coming out.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: It’s really exciting.

PRESS: [OVERLAPPING] [Yeah.], this movie, the Sherlock new series, and The Hobbit.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: And The Hobbit.

PRESS: Have you stopped working? Have you had a week off in the past year?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Apparently I had ten days in the summer, but they went by in a bit of a blur. It’s been a very, very busy year, but it’s an embarrassment, the riches. I’m loathe to complain about them, I’m really enjoying it, and you know, as my erstwhile character Sherlock says, you know, a new job is as good as a change, or change is as good as a rest even. I think that’s what he says. He says it in signafore, so you guys can look it up and see how badly I can misquote him, let alone behave like him. But yeah, it’s been an amazing – it is an amazing time at the moment, and I’m really enjoying it.

PRESS: How did you enjoy the hair in this movie?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: I kind of did, I kind of did, and they eyes were a little bit more arduous. I quite liked, I had a kind of skunky badger thing with white run hair my normal sort dark hair on top – I did love the fact that for about six months last year, both in August: Osage and in 12 Years a Slave, I had my own color hair, which is great. But I really, I quite enjoyed it, I quite enjoyed putting the wigs on.

Enjoy the rest of the interview after the Jump...

PRESS: Does it take you there?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: It does a bit. Yeah, of course it does. I think the first time I put it on, and I kind of came into the room, people were like “Oh, wow!” And that’s a great thrill when you think, okay, well, something’s working. I mean, I think he’s got softer features, and I mean, I think I’m a little more angular, which sometimes makes me look a little weird and creepy with some of the wigs, and that’s not the intention at all. I just think that’s just the way I look and that’s not, you know, we weren’t trying to do that, but that’s just the different bone structure. I’ve got a longer face, he’s got a rounder face, so you know, it was a challenge. The harder thing was the contact lenses because I’ve never worn them before. They’re brilliant at it now –

PRESS: What color are your eyes?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: It’s just when you get to – brown eyes? No, blue. Well, I’ve got light aquamarine, greeny kind of things. It changes, whatever kind of light, I guess, is stronger, or color is stronger. But mine are lighter, that’s the thing, much, much lighter than his, and in certain lights his are just this really deep, rich kind of blue, and in other lights, they’re kind of slatey gray or dark, and so I wanted to kind of tone down my eyes a little bit, so that, as well as the teeth here, as well, I had a new set of kind of prosthetic teeth and a slightly bigger lip here to kind of push that forwards ‘cause I’ve got a very big bottom lip and it’s just we have a slightly different structure to our faces, so I wanted to try and experiment with that a little bit.

PRESS: He’s such an arrogant, brilliant person. I mean, he knows he’s smart, but you know, he doesn’t care about other people.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: That’s your opinion.

PRESS: Did you talk to Bill about making Julian Assange somebody that the audience, if they couldn’t quite identify with him, they wouldn’t hate him?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: It was important to me to portray him as a three-dimensional human being and not get into a slagging match about whether he was good or bad. I wanted to portray human characteristics about a man at the forefront of an incredible media revolution, with incredible ideas, whose controversy was borne out of that primarily and not get bogged down in character assassinations which is so easy to come by, because people want a headline, they want to grab something and run with a two-dimensional story. And I like the way the film tackles that and I like the way that Julian talks about his appraisal in The New York Times as getting equal bidding for the state of his socks, as for collateral murder, kind of highlights that idiocy. So it was important to me to portray him in a balanced way.

PRESS: I read that you communicated with Julian and at one point he attempted to dissuade you from doing the project. Can you describe your communications with him and what ways those informed you?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: I tried to justify my reasons for doing the project and that was where that ended.

PRESS: You weren’t going to step out because Julian asked you not to?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: It mattered to me a lot that he felt so passionately, but I wanted to persuade him that it wasn’t necessarily going to be as bad as he feared it would be, both from the script he’d had leaked to him, which is a very old draft, I don’t even think I ever saw that draft, but yeah.

PRESS: Was your comunication via email?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah.

PRESS: That was my question. So was it just a couple exchanges back and forth?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah. And private between us. Yeah.

PRESS: The film was very much from kind of Daniel’s perspective and through his filter.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yes.

PRESS: How challenging was that to you as you were kind of pulling together Assange and how you wanted to balance that?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: From the perspective of the film, none, because you concentrate how you are in the moment that you are in the film, so if people are commenting about your character or reacting to your character, that’s drama, you know, it’s not something you worry about. You get on with playing your intention in a given moment and when the action changes in the scene you think about what your characteristic is and how that will inform what tactics you use to therefore, you know, get what you want out of the scene as a character and that’s kind of how I go about my daily work.

PRESS: There’s so much  material that you could use to kind of pull together things for this. I mean, there’s interviews.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: As much as I could. A lot, an awful lot. It was important to, you know, to concentrate on what we were doing, which is making a film, a dramatization of events. So while it was informative, it was important for me to always remember that this is a perspective, not the perspective. I think the film’s central message is there’s no such thing as objective truth, there’s always going to be a personal truth and you have to, I think, take the inspiration of this film is that it is about people journalism, it’s about something that’s powered by individuals, it’s not about a consensus, and I think that’s probably how the film will be greeted and reacted to, and I mean, that’s no bad thing.

PRESS: How do you see Julian’s relationship with Daniel? I mean, is it kind of like a master/slave, an S&M relationship.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: No, neither of those things.

PRESS: He keeps coming back for more?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: No.

PRESS: How would you describe it?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Have you seen the film?

PRESS: Yeah, yeah.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Well, how would you describe it? Neither of those things, for example. I don’t think it’s that extreme.

PRESS: Ah, okay.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: You do?

PRESS: Well, I just think that there are many times in the film with what he says to him and how he demeans him and how he ridicules him, a normal person would get up and walk out and say, “Fuck you, goodbye.” And he doesn’t.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah.

PRESS: I think Julian’s intoxicating. I think that someone who has power like that, an interpreted power, is intoxicating.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah.

PRESS: What do you think about that?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: I think it’s really complicated and it’s really for those two to disseminate it, not me as an actor outside of it. I think, you know, but in a moment of drama, you have empathy for your character, so I see his perspective as strongly as I can as now as an audience see both perspectives. It’s a very complex relationship, and two very complex characters. Daniel is no stooge, you know, he’s not this follower, he’s a smart guy, he’s an activist, he’s incredibly, you know, pragmatic. He’s not just a sort of blind acolyte. I think Julian has a magnetic hold over people and I think he’s an incredible spokesperson for an extraordinary idea that was borne out of his realization of it. And you know, he has very complex relationships with people because of that.

PRESS: We see flashes when he mentions things about his past. “I have a 19 year old son.”

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah.

PRESS: things like that. Did you see that as sort of letting the audience see another side of him.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: On a level, yes, because, you know, I think the kind of banner headline, as I might have said in here, I’m beginning to get a bit blurred about what I’ve said in here or next door, but you know, the kind of perception of him in a tabloid sense is very two-dimensional. The character assassinations came hot on the foot of all the kind of shifting perspectives and press war and everything that went on at the time of the leak, so I think a lot of people’s perspective on him is very crude. So anything that flashes out who he is as a three-dimensional human being I think is to his benefit, and god knows what he’ll think of that, but as an audience I think you can understand more of someone when they are part of something that’s universal to all of us. And while, you know, I think it’s very clear he doesn’t want the message to get confused with the messenger, and that’s happened. We obsess about that, I think, in culture, all the time. We can’t just take an actor’s work, we need to know everything about their personality. We can’t just take a politician’s stance, again, we need to know what it is that relates us, and I’m not saying that’s a good or a bad thing, but sometimes I think it can corrupt what a heart is, you know, an extraordinary thing.

PRESS: Do you see a link between Julian, who is so brilliant, and as I said earlier, kind of arrogant, with Sherlock, who is also brilliant and perceived as arrogant and maybe some people have said he’s got Asperger’s. He doesn’t relate to people.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: I think it’s a pretty obvious but slightly lazy association. I think they’re very, very different characters, for obvious reasons.
The film stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Daniel Brühl, Anthony Mackie, David Thewlis, Alicia Vikander, Peter Capaldi, Carice van Houten, Dan Stevens, with Stanley Tucci and Laura Linney and was directed by Bill Condon.


PRESS: Where do you stand –

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: You tell me, because what you’re saying is obvious, is the link, so I’m intrigued to know if you can spot any differences.

PRESS: Well, I didn’t think about it until [Okay.] just now, but you’re an actor in them and it’s, you know.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Yeah, but I don’t need to impact as an audience, do you know what I mean? I think it’s pretty obvious. I mean, if you’re saying that I conform to a type in my work, then yeah, there are crossovers, I’m sure, but have a look at “Little” Charles in August: Osage and William Ford as well, ‘cause they’re nothing like Julian or Sherlock. And that’s not me being defensive, that’s me explaining that I think there are subtle – well, huge differences, actually, between Sherlock and Julian.
PRESS: Talk a little bit about August: Osage. We can’t wait to see it.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Me neither. I still haven’t seen it, so I can’t talk to you much about it.

PRESS: Who do you play though?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: I play “Little” Charles, who’s this adorable, really, lost soul who is trying to find a place in the world that’s sort of, ah, it kind of cuts him out. He’s in love with someone that’s very close to him and that has to remain a secret, and it kind of tears him apart, and he’s constantly being belittled by a sort of destructively loving and protective mother, because of the secret surrounding who he really is, and he’s a pretty tragic figure but rather a beautiful soul. He’s an alright singer and songwriter. You guys have seen it. You’ve seen it?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: No? Okay. I thought you did ‘cause I do sing and play the piano in it. But yeah, I love that job. I mean, I loved the play. And when I heard they were doing it I said, I’ve got to audition this, but there’s only – I said, I’d kill to play that part, are you kidding me? And to sit round that table and watch Meryl, I mean all of us were just in awe. I mean, it’s an amazing table to sit round, but all of us just kind of forgot to act in character because were just in an audience going – astonishing. Astonishing.
PRESS: What was it like to work with Meryl?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Like that. I mean, it really was spectacularly – it was very, very inspiring. It was very inspiring. I know every actor says that that works with her, but it really was. It’s a trip, it’s an absolute trip.

PRESS: You asked her a question about acting, and you said something about –

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Well, because you know, I was about to – what was I about to do? Assange, I think it was, I think Julian was the next project. So I said, you know, where do you start with – ‘cause obviously with Julian, I’m not Australian, I don’t have the same speech pattern as him, other physical attributes and differences, his withholding himself, his gestures, all that sort of thing. So I kind of said to her, ‘cause she was just doing this incredible delivery, she was playing someone with esophageal cancer, it was high on drugs, downers, it was getting drunk at her husband’s wake, it was turning vulnerable into attack into lost into knowing into sexy, vampy. The gear shifts were sublime. And I just wondered how she was playing this orchestra of a performance, you know, and I said, well, chicken and egg, cart and horse, what gives? And she went, “I don’t know. I don’t really, I mean, with this it was different, I mean, all of it came at once. How about you?” Oh, thank fuck for that, ‘cause I don’t have a method, I wasn’t schooled in a method necessarily. I mean, I’ve got tools that I carry around very gratefully from my time at drama school and also what I’ve learned by working with people like Meryl and great directors like Bill and Danny Boyle and Tomas Alfredson and Richard Daystrom, I been so spoiled with the roster of talent I’ve worked with. So and like we both agreed, if you have one way of approaching it, it kind of limits what you do and also what other people can do with you, so it was reassuring, it was really reassuring. It’s a really nice moment.

PRESS: And she said, “Do you know his fans are called Cumber [cut off]?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: they’re actually changing themselves to Cumber-collectors, most of them now. I’ve gone down the route of reversing the sort of negative backlash of however many years of feminism, and it was a little bit worrying, and I didn’t ask for this sort of subservient demeaning collective noun, and they’ve very kindly said “Oh, no, it was only a joke.” Well, you know, it’s best to make a slightly more politically correct joke about it in my name. But I mean, it’s one of the least offensive nicknames I have on the internet, if you care to Google it, there’s all sorts of nonsense, but I have had that since high school so I’ve got quite a thick skin about that.

PRESS: How do you feel about this new sort of like level of success and celebrity you’ve obtained?

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH: Wow, this is another interview. This is like a profile suddenly, isn’t it?"


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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Dom Sep 22, 2013 9:38 am


Os dejo aquí la entrevista que sale mañana en El suplemento de El País Semanal sobre Bene hecha el pasado Festival de Toronto,hablando de Wikileaks.Ya dejé el enlace en el post de él Very Happy Very Happy 



 Cumberbatch, el doble de Julian Assange
Heredero británico de una dinastía de actores. Curtido en las tablas de las pequeñas compañías teatrales londinenses
Benedict Cumberbatch es el hombre de moda en Hollywood con seis películas por estrenar. En una de ellas da vida al fundador de Wikileaks
Toni García 22 SEP 2013 - 00:00 CET  

 Empezó sin hacer mucho ruido. Como si no quisiera llamar la atención. Pequeños papeles aquí y allí, algunos escenarios, un montón de Shakespeare, mucha televisión. En realidad, un currículo no muy distinto del de cualquier actor inglés tratando de vivir de la actuación: picando piedra en alguna pequeña compañía mientras el mundo decide si tienes lo que hay que tener para pasar a formar parte de ese pequeño círculo de intérpretes afortunados que pueden aspirar a algo más. Un actor, hijo de actores (Timothy Carlton y Wanda Ventham), educado en escuelas privadas, enamorado de los teatros y piedra rosetta de una generación que incluye a figuras como Tom Hardy o James McAvoy. “No lo sé, la verdad es que no lo sé, una combinación de factores, la suerte y la insistencia. Ningún actor puede contarte la receta del éxito, solo puedes trabajar y esperar que tu trabajo hable por ti, eso es todo”.

Benedict Cumberbatch (Londres, 1976) se ha pasado la última década subiendo tan rápido en el universo cinematográfico que casi no le ha dado tiempo a darse cuenta de que ya no puede subir más: ha sido Stephen Hawking, el villano de Star Trek, Sherlock Holmes o Alan Rickman (en Los Simpson). Ha trabajado con Steven Spielberg, Peter Jackson, J. J. Abrams o Joe Wright, y ha aparecido en películas de 250 millones de euros y en otras que costaron nada (o casi nada) sin dejar nunca de crecer como actor, desde que en 2007 asombrara a los cinéfilos con su papel en Stuart: una vida al revés.

“Un periodista me dijo que tenía pinta de extraterrestre. Le di las gracias por aquello”
Cumberbatch es ahora el hombre de moda en Hollywood, con seis películas por estrenar, cinco más en producción, una serie de televisión memorable y un talento que exprime a través de un aspecto que combina el lado más felino del gentleman británico con un rostro lleno de interrogantes que parece regido por algún tipo de organismo superior.

“Un periodista me dijo una vez que tenía pinta de extraterrestre. No supe que decirle, así que le di las gracias”, cuenta Cumberbatch añadiendo una carcajada al final. El actor sostiene un gigantesco batido de color verde (“no sé muy bien qué hay dentro, solo que tiene zumo de naranja y un montón de hierbas”) y trata de sortear los restos de su desayuno para que el periodista pueda colocar la grabadora. Es la mañana siguiente a la première mundial de El quinto poder: dentro de Wikileaks, una película que cuenta la historia de Julian Assange y su descenso a los infiernos, y que tiene previsto su estreno en España el próximo 18 de octubre.

Es bien sabido que Assange ha cargado contra el filme, especialmente porque el autor del libro en que se basa, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, mantiene con el cofundador de Wikileaks una disputa que solo podría resolverse con un duelo al amanecer.

La historia de Julian Assange es harto conocida: hacker de primera, programador con fama de minucioso, periodista enfurecido. Cuando en 2006 fundó el portal de Internet Wikileaks, pocos pensaron que aquel hombre que podía (o no) ser australiano y tener (o no) 32 años desencadenaría la crisis diplomática más grande de la historia con la publicación de decenas de miles de documentos confidenciales que describían la –confusa– relación de Estados Unidos con sus aliados y otros que no lo eran tanto.

Julian Assange ha cargado contra el filme, basado en el libro de su ex mano derecha
En julio de 2010, la página de Assange daba a conocer más de 70.000 documen­­tos que aclaran el rol de los estadounidenses en la guerra de Afganistán, incluyendo el asesinato de civiles y el uso de dudosas tácticas de contraterrorismo. En noviembre de ese mismo año se destapaba el escándalo de los 250.000 cables del Departamento de Estado norteamericano con sus embajadas repartidas por todo el mundo, filtrados por Wikileaks y publicados por cinco medios internacionales, entre ellos EL PAÍS. Desde entonces, el líder de Wikileaks ha sido acusado de varios crímenes de naturaleza sexual en Suecia y ha acabado refugiado en la Embajada de Ecuador en Londres. De allí solo podría sacarle la reducción de la presión que llega desde el otro lado del Atlántico, algo que difícilmente podría producirse.

“¿La pregunta más repetida? La gente me interroga por Assange y sobre si yo creo que es un ángel o un demonio, un héroe o un traidor. ¿Qué opino? Creo que esas preguntas no debo contestarlas yo, no acostumbro a juzgar a mis personajes. Lo que sí creo es que es alguien muy importante, alguien extremadamente relevante”. Cumberbatch contrae el rostro después de darle el primer trago largo a su batido de hierbas desconocidas, luego lo deja en la mesa y sonríe. “Digamos que el sabor es inesperadamente intenso: casi me explotan los oídos”. Viste una chaqueta gris de tweed y una camisa vaquera. Va peinado como el que acaba de salir de un partido de polo. En la sala, cuatro publicistas sumergidos en sus respectivos teléfonos acreditan el calado de la figura de Cumberbatch. La cita con El País Semanal se produce en un salón del hotel Ritz Carlton de Toronto, con puntualidad británica, a primera hora de la mañana. El actor aún no ha tenido que sufrir la lluvia de medios que sus representantes le tienen preparado para el día de hoy y que –probablemente– son la razón del batido de hierbas. “Salud en copa, tío”.

ampliar foto
El actor Benedict Cumberbatch con Gary Oldman en ‘El topo’ (2011). / ALBUM

Sin la melena blanca que luce en la película y recuperada su voz original, que a veces ha prestado a documentalistas, el británico es consciente de lo que se le viene encima y parece tener ensayadas todas las respuestas. “Recuerdo perfectamente la primera vez que oí hablar de Julian Assange: fue en 2010, aunque yo estaba más interesado en el mensaje que en el personaje. También me preocupaba que todo aquello que revelaba Wikileaks estuviera pasando en Afganistán. Recuerdo que hubo muchísima gente protestando en la calle por aquello. Fueron el mensaje y la fuente los que me sorprendieron. Si hablamos de la figura de Julian, pues debo decir que no fue hasta que acepté este papel cuando realmente conecté con él, y francamente, me alegro de ello, porque hay tanta información sobre Assange que hubiera sido como asesinar al personaje antes de empezar con él. Además, está el hecho de que todo lo que leías sobre él estaba influenciado, de un modo u otro, por la agenda del medio de comunicación donde aparecía esa información. Además, los medios tradicionales trataban de descalificarle porque él representaba la aparición de una nueva clase de periodismo que no estaba previsto. Con todo eso en mente, y con la dificultad de establecer una perspectiva clara, miré muchísimas horas de metraje en las que el propio Assange hablaba de Wikileaks y de sí mismo, y creo que eso fue lo más útil para hacerme una idea real del personaje, de quién era y de lo que representaba. Lo cierto es que cuando uno –como actor– se enfrenta a un tipo como Assange, la cantidad de información al alcance de la mano puede ser una arma de doble filo, y, de hecho, a mí me puso las cosas muy difíciles porque no sabía dónde empezar a buscar, había tantas piezas que encajar… Si le miras de cerca verás lo inteligente que es, es alguien realmente impresionante, muy bien documentado y con gran acceso a mil fuentes de información. Mientras intentaba procesar todo eso tenía que trabajar en esa forma tan particular que tiene de hablar, con esas eses suaves, y además, aprenderme el guion, aguantar un rodaje en cinco países distintos y tratar de hablar con él a través de amigos, aunque fuera por correo electrónico. ¿Qué como lo hice? Pues con una disciplina de trabajo muy rigurosa y una agenda planificada al milímetro… puedo decir que ha sido el rodaje más duro de mi carrera”.

“No opino sobre mis papeles, pero Assange es alguien muy importante y relevante”
Mientras que la crítica no ha logrado ponerse de acuerdo en si la película retrata con verosimilitud la complicada historia de la página web de filtraciones más famosa de la historia, en lo que sí han coincidido todos (crítica y público) los que ya han visto la película es que Cumberbatch consigue un Assange que se parece de modo escalofriante al original: un tipo poliédrico, movido por una –demoledora– combinación de ego y conocimiento, cuya cruzada ha quedado en pausa. “Sí, por supuesto que siento más responsabilidad que normalmente. No es solo que él sea un personaje relevante (que lo es), sino que hay muchísima expectación para saber si hemos contado esta historia de una forma correcta. Lo que he intentado es tener un compromiso muy fuerte con mis compañeros de reparto y con mi director, Bill [Condom, director de la película]. Él ha sido el hombre que me ha puesto en el carril correcto cuando yo tenía dudas acerca de cómo seguir. Lo que quería, y espero haberlo conseguido, es dejar que el personaje respire a través de la interpretación, en lugar de intentar etiquetarlo de un modo u otro. Hablamos muchísimo entre tomas de las implicaciones del trabajo que estábamos haciendo, y creo que eso contribuye al equilibrio de la película”.

Sin embargo, a pesar del buen ambiente de trabajo que el actor describe, lo cierto es que algunos medios de comunicación hablaron de la mala relación que este mantenía con el realizador. “Eso es una estupidez, perdona por la expresión. Bill y yo mantuvimos una relación magnífica durante todo el proceso, y, de hecho, si no hubiera sido por esa colaboración diaria con la que tratamos de construir la trama, no habría película. Y lo mismo digo de Daniel [Brühl], un actor maravilloso, absolutamente magnífico y nada egoísta”.

Con Assange calificando el filme de “propaganda al servicio de la mentira” y la película a punto de estreno en todo el mun­­do, a Cumberbatch, uno de esos tipos que se meten hasta la cocina de cualquier personaje, se le presenta otro problema: “Cuando salí de El quinto poder me fui a rodar Sherlock, y en varias ocasiones me vi hablando con las malditas eses suaves [risas]. Era un reflejo involuntario, pero después de haberme pasado tantos meses con el personaje era algo inevitable. Lo que pasa es que, cuando me ponía a hablar así, metido en el personaje de Sherlock Holmes, parecía como si me hubiera tomado un tranquilizante para caballos. Fue complicado, bromas aparte, librarme de él, sobre todo porque yo no quería quedarme en los titulares, quería cavar a fondo. Así que fue muy complicado empatizar con él y luego dejarle a un lado para volver a mi vida normal. Lo que he aprendido de este personaje, especialmente a un nivel sociopolítico, y del funcionamiento de las democracias es algo muy valioso: lo que he aprendido del periodismo, del cuarto poder, de su complejidad, de la valía del periodismo ciudadano…”.

“Con esta película he aprendido el valor del cuarto poder, el periodismo”
Y prosigue Cumberbatch: “Por supuesto que cambió muchas cosas: él abrió la puerta, y mucha gente le ha seguido. Cambió la percepción que tenemos de la información y cómo esta se produce y distribuye. Creo que ayudó a la gente a darse cuenta de que era posible reconstruir la democracia. Y en cuanto al periodismo, tú eres periodista, tú sabes que el periodismo se basa en la necesidad de generar contenidos que, sin embargo, no están regidos siempre por el mismo criterio: puedes presentar esta pieza sobre mí a tu jefe y que este te diga: ‘No, así no’. No sé si me explico, es algo muy complejo. Coge simplemente el espionaje masivo que se ha producido sobre nuestras comunicaciones, seguramente en nombre de una buena causa. Lo que sabemos en realidad es que a costa de nuestra libertad y nuestros derechos civiles intentamos combatir a los enemigos que quieren acabar precisamente con eso. Es un asunto terrible: nadie puede decirte cómo y dónde nos están espiando… es complicado”. Sobre su agenda futura, con el espesor de un listín telefónico, el británico tiene pocos comentarios que añadir: “Es un poco abrumador, pero este es el trabajo que he escogido. ¿Cómo me sienta tener tres títulos en el Festival de Toronto? Pues es algo bastante desconcertante, pero me gusta ver que son tres personajes absolutamente diferentes en películas distintas”. El trío ganador lo componen Agosto, 12 años de esclavitud y la citada El quinto poder. Para las dos primeras suenan los violines de los Oscar; para la tercera, los cantos de sirena que llegan desde la taquilla. Tres películas en uno de los festivales más grandes del mundo para un actor de apellido imposible.

Pero Cumberbatch sabe que no solo de cine vive el hombre, y, por eso, en 2010, cuando pocos le conocían lo suficiente como para saber con quién trataban, se alistó en Sherlock. La serie, una revisión en clave contemporánea del detective más famoso de la historia, podía haberse estrellado antes de empezar, pero la envergadura dramática de su protagonista destrozó a los agoreros y estableció el anhelado estatus de serie de culto para un producto que se asoma ya a su tercera temporada, después de que la segunda entrega acabara con un cliffhanger que hubiera asustado al mismísimo Dickens.

El show, popular a ambos lados del Atlántico, solo ha sido el último clavo en una escalera que parece no tener fin y que contempla todas las disciplinas habidas y por haber. “Para mí no hay demasiada diferencia. El teatro es más inmediato, la televisión es más veloz (al menos en el proceso), y el cine, más grande, aunque no siempre. Al final, todo se reduce a mi trabajo como actor, a ese cuadrilátero de intimidad que se produce con tus colegas y con tu director. Esa es la clave”.

“A costa de nuestra libertad intentamos combatir a los que quieren acabar con ella”
“La tercera temporada va a salir en el Reino Unido entre finales de diciembre y principios de enero del año que viene, esa es la información que tengo. ¿Que si vamos a poder explicar el final de la segunda temporada? [risas]. Ya lo verás, solo puedo decirte que creo que la espera va a valer la pena. La temporada es en realidad una reunificación, y eso va a tener un peso muy grande en la trama. Además, llega un personaje muy importante, el de la mujer de Watson, Mary, y un nuevo villano, maravilloso: Charles Augustus Magnussen, que interpreta Lars Mikkelsen. Créeme, es la mejor temporada de todas”, dice este tipo de Londres con esa cara de saber mucho más de lo que en realidad cuenta.

Con esa señal del publicista que significa ‘última pregunta’, el encuentro con Cumberbatch llega a su fin. Le traen otro batido (“lo mismo, ya le voy cogiendo el gusto”, ironiza), y un nuevo periodista asoma por la puerta. “¿Lo peor de mi profesión? La prensa, obviamente”, dice mientras estrecha la mano con una sonrisa de oreja a oreja. “No


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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Sep 22, 2013 10:53 am

No se muy bien que decir pero.... cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers 

hayyy que contenta , por lo menos sabe que en spain sabemos que exsiste Very Happy Very Happy Razz , por fin me he podido enterar de una entrevista sobre este tema como debe ser (bien!!!! jeejjjejeje Razz) por otra parte me da una pena con lo del batido jajajj pobrecito sonaba fatal hahaha , me ha encantado que la entrevista para el pais fuese la primera asi no estaba hasta las boulings de contestar lo mismo  Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy  y que haga bromas con el periodista tambien me ha gustado mucho jajajajajajajja y nosotras aqui tendemos a exagerar bastante Embarassed Embarassed  pero el con lo de la explosion de oidos nos ha ganado jajajajajajj que pronto aprende jajajaajaj , eso si me ha copiado lo de No sé si me explico , ehhh !!!! Ben guapo que eso es mio Cool Cool Cool Cool Cool  jajajajajja , señor topo no ehh que no copie que lo denuncio por plagio jajajajajajajajajjaja  y si se explica estupendamente ademas nosotras somos muy listas y lo entedemos todo a la primera y la verdad lo que mas me ha gustado que todos le preguntan por sherlock y el es como Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  y aqui lo nombra sin el otro preguntarle , eso es un guiño chicas jajajajajjjaja gracias señor topo Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Razz Razz 

pue eso que lo I louviou a lot  yo tambien.

por cierto una preguntas lo de
copa de salud tio  , lo dice Ben ???? Shocked Shocked Shocked 
vengaaa amigitos forever ¿¿no??? Shocked Shocked Shocked  jajajajajajajajjajja

lo que tambien me ha echo gracia lo de una extirpe de actores , si... si... su padre y su madre una extirpe la largusima Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing  si es que....Laughing Laughing Laughing 

Pero por favorr que alguien me explique como todavia puede haber gente que no quiere a este hombre?!?!!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!
Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy 

pd: y eso que no sabia que decir Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed  si no escribo otra entrevista jajajajjaja
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  AdrianaDS el Dom Sep 22, 2013 8:52 pm

Muchas gracias por colgar la entrevista!! Muy interesante, y qué ilusión me hace que salga en medios españoles Very Happy Very Happy 
Lo del batido me ha matado lol! 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Dom Sep 22, 2013 10:24 pm

Me quedo con una frase que me ha encantado, "A costa de nuestra libertad intentamos combatir a los que quieren acabar con ella"
Le adoro, simplemente no puedo decir otra cosa que persona más interesante
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Sep 22, 2013 11:14 pm

Con esa te quedas Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked  que profundo es este hombre Shocked Shocked Shocked 

voy a elegir una tonteria

asi que yo me quedo con lo de.... Metido en el personaje de Sherlock Holmes, parecía como si me hubiera tomado un tranquilizante para caballos.

lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! 

Please señores de la BBC ponganlo en los extras de la 3 temporada Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Sep 29, 2013 12:46 am

Sorry por el doble post pero traigo "entrevista"
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Oct 05, 2013 1:05 am

Entrevista de hoy para the independent , larga muy larga pero bueno como todas las de Ben Laughing Laughing  Razz
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'It's not like I've completely conquered everything...': Benedict Cumberbatch interview

Benedict Cumberbatch is Hollywood's most ubiquitous Brit. Even he can't remember all the movies he has coming out, he tells James Mottram




Even the brightest stars can have their off days. Take Benedict Cumberbatch and his time on the set of the recent Star Trek Into Darkness, playing the villainous Khan. One scene took place at California's National Ignition Facility, a real-life laboratory practising nuclear fusion. His co-star Simon Pegg told him it was a dangerous location and that he would need protection from special “neutron cream”.

“I was convinced that I had to put dots of this cream on my face,” says Cumberbatch, smiling. With others in on the prank, every morning the cast would all “shake off” the potentially poisonous neutrons. “There was also a disclaimer I had to sign, basically saying, 'I'm aware of the physical dangers of working in this environment'. I didn't even read it; I just put it against the wall and signed it… God knows what else I've signed in my life that I might have got into trouble for.”

It's a delicious image: the quicksilver Cumberbatch covered in cream, as he readies himself for his close-up. This, after all, is an actor who has so far traded on playing intellectually robust characters: Sherlock Holmes (in the Golden Globe and Bafta-nominated hit re-invention of the character), physicist Stephen Hawking (in TV movie Hawking), abolitionist Prime Minister William Pitt (in Amazing Grace) and, in his current job, The Imitation Game, Second World War Enigma code-cracker Alan Turing.

When I meet Cumberbatch, in a basement room of a Covent Garden hotel, he arrives with a canvas bag full of books, like a student heading to lectures. Inside was a treasure trove of required reading for his roles – notably an account of The First World War, The Great War, there to inspire further thinking about Christopher Tietjens, in the BBC's Ford Madox Ford adaptation Parade's End. Also in the bag were Cultivation and Culture and We Lived in a Little Cabin in the Yard, two very different books on slavery.

Both were preparation for playing a “very paternal slave owner” in Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave, one of four major movies Cumberbatch has on the way in the next three months. Even he can't keep count. He has to be reminded that the second part of Peter Jackson's The Hobbit will be in cinemas in December, 10 days before the arrival of the all-star familial drama August: Osage County with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts. “I had a really busy year last year, and the beginning of this year, and all of them are coming home to roost in the same year, which is quite extraordinary,” he says.

Such is the variety of his work to date, there's something restless about his mind. At one point, he stops to listen to an almost inaudible noise in the room. “Is that getting louder or is it just me? It's a bulb that's going to blow.” Then he sees me scribble a note. Peering towards my notebook, he asks “What did you write down?” I have to confess that I've managed the less-than-stellar description “white T-shirt” – to go with the baggy shorts and flip-flops he's currently sporting. “White T-shirt! Oh, right! Is that the impression I've made so far? It's like your readers are in the room with you.”

He is, of course, joking, but that's not to say he can't be dismissive when he wants to be. Take the sex-symbol status that's grown around him, with many entranced by his high-cut cheekbones, brown curls and watchful blue eyes. This week a poll for the movie magazine Empire voted him the World's Sexiest Film Star, ahead of Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper, a result he declared “hysterically funny” (“I've punched well above my weight this year...”). How does he feel about being lusted after? “Oh, read the press cuttings. Various responses to that one.” Look in those cuttings and you can find what he thinks about his female fanbase – the so-called Cumberbitches. “I was a little disturbed,” he said. “I think they set feminism back a few years.”

He is currently single, after ending a relationship with the fashion designer Anna Jones in 2012. A year before that, he and actress Olivia Poulet (The Thick of It) called time on their 12-year relationship, one that began when they both studied drama at Manchester University. So all this fuss must be a little discombobulating; particularly given he seems rather ill at ease with his own looks. “I think I've got a long face,” he says. “I look a bit weird.”

This is true of his next, and arguably most intriguing big-screen outing – playing the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in Bill Condon's The Fifth Estate. “I'm thrilled with it,” he admits, quite unreservedly. “I'd seen it in the States and I was terrified. I cannot watch myself for the first time, especially playing someone who is so removed from me – because of everything, the appearance, the accent. Everything about him is different.”

Crowned with white hair and giving a decent rendition of Assange's soft Australian drawl, the 37-year-old Cumberbatch is certainly far removed from his comfort zone (Variety praised him for capturing “Assange's slightly other-worldly air as well as numerous creepier qualities”). And while he nails the messiah complex of a man who begins to believe his own press, Cumberbatch is swift to point out the film is not a character assassination of Assange.

“I think Bill has made a beautiful film; it's incredibly balanced. It's entertaining as well as intriguing. And what it should do is ignite a debate – that's exactly what should happen. And hopefully it will do that.” Indeed, whatever the flaws of the film, it's certainly timely, given the recent 35-year prison sentence handed out to Bradley Manning, the US soldier who mailed 250,000 diplomatic US cables to WikiLeaks (an act that drives the second half of The Fifth Estate).

The film skirts over the issues that have led Assange to currently be holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy in London – after he fled there to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sex offences against two women. Yet even amid his self-inflicted exile, Assange secured an early draft of the script, criticising it when he gave an address via video-link to the Oxford Union, calling it “a mass propaganda against WikiLeaks, the organisation and the character of my staff and our activities”.

He added that it “fans the flames to start a war with Iran”, a comment made in reaction to the original opening scene – which was set in a military complex in Tehran, with a close-up on a file detailing plans for making a nuclear bomb. That scene no longer exists in the finished film, doubtless excised after Assange's criticism. He and Cumberbatch also exchanged emails, briefly, after he pleaded with the actor to withdraw from the project. Cumberbatch wrote back, telling Assange that it wouldn't be a negative portrayal.

Talk to Cumberbatch's fellow cast members and it sounds as if the actor did soften the script's more hard-line approach. “I think he's turned the film around,” says David Thewlis, who plays Nick Davies, one of the journalists central to the publication of Manning's leaked cables. “I think he became more sympathetic towards Julian as the film went on, as opposed to the script [which] changed.” For Cumberbatch, he simply wanted to portray a three-dimensional character “and not get into a slagging match about whether Assange was good or bad”.

While The Fifth Estate drew mixed responses at its premiere at the Toronto Film Festival last month, there was more love for his other two films there. August: Osage County is an adaptation of Tracy Letts's Broadway hit about a dysfunctional Oklahoma family. As part of the sprawling Weston clan with Sam Shepard, Streep and Roberts, Cumberbatch makes an impression as the clumsy, unemployed “Little'”Charles.

It was his third film premiere at Toronto, 12 Years a Slave, that really generated rave reviews. Directed by Steve McQueen, and co-starring Michael Fassbender and Brad Pitt, Cumberbatch calls it an “extraordinary” story. “It's all based on the truth of this guy called Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor. It's his film, and there's several of us principals supporting him through this terrible journey he goes on, living as a free man, being drugged and waking up in bondage and being taken down to the plantations in Virginia,” he explains.

With a third season of Sherlock due at Christmas, he will also be seen in The Hobbit – hopefully in full this time, after we glimpsed just his digitally enhanced eye at the end of the first instalment of Jackson's three-part Tolkien adaptation. “You'll get the rest of me in the second [part],” he smiles. For the uninitiated, he plays Smaug, the fearsome dragon that Bilbo Baggins (played by Cumberbatch's Sherlock co-star, Martin Freeman) is journeying to confront.

Using the same motion-capture procedure that Andy Serkis made famous when he played Gollum – sensors cover the body, capturing performance – it meant Cumberbatch did all of his work in LA, away from the New Zealand set. It wasn't easy to get his head around. “A serpent with cold blood and a backbone – who is twice the size of the Empire State Building, breathes fire, is 400 years old and lives on a pile of gold in the middle of a mountain, is a little bit difficult to bring any reality to,” he says.

Not that such a thing is likely to faze someone born into the profession. Raised in Chelsea, his parents were both actors with long careers in film and television. His father is Timothy Carlton and his mother Wanda Ventham (they appeared together in the 1973 BBC series, The Lotus Eaters). His family wasn't “particularly moneyed” and Cumberbatch believes that has rubbed off.

“I don't live beyond my means. I enjoy luxury and I enjoy the privilege of it, when I can afford it, and I'm in the situation where it's been given to me, but I'm very conscious of what is wasteful.”

While he did attend Harrow, it was via an arts scholarship. There he began reading plays and acting on stage (something he has continued with great success, from his Olivier-nominated role in Hedda Gabler to Danny Boyle's Frankenstein, where he and Jonny Lee Miller alternated parts every night, to a proposed West End outing as Hamlet next year). At the time, his parents wanted him to be a barrister, something safe and “grown-up”, but relented when they realised how much potential he had.

They weren't wrong, with Cumberbatch swiftly graduating from television bit-parts (Silent Witness, Nathan Barley) to film. He made an impression as the University Challenge team leader in Starter For 10, and small roles in Joe Wright's Atonement and the Charles Darwin tale Creation followed. But it wasn't until 2011 that he really exploded. “I had a perfect storm in that year,” he says, as the first season of Sherlock and the Frankenstein production combined with noticeable parts in Steven Spielberg's War Horse and the celebrated adaptation of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

He has just signed to play 1920s Amazon explorer Percy Fawcett – a role once mooted for Brad Pitt. There's chatter too that he'll reunite with Star Trek director JJ Abrams, for the new Star Wars movie. The need for more neutron cream aside, is he worried this hot streak might fizzle? He says not. “I've always had an eye on longevity; I've got loads more goals to achieve. It's not like I've completely conquered the whole thing. That's a lifetime's objective, not an overnight thing.”

'The Fifth Estate' opens on 11 October; 'The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug' and 'August: Osage County' are released in December. '12 Years a Slave' opens in January



jajajajaj el no lee , para que Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes pues haber si aprende y lee lo que firma , que digo que con lo listo que es sabra leer , no?? jajajajajajajaj, que escribes? jajajajajajajaj esta echo todo una vieja el visillo ajajajajajajajj
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Sáb Oct 12, 2013 10:35 am

Preguntas y respuestas de Benedict en Reddit del 11-10-13:

1) R_Cmbrbtch_group -What is your favorite childhood memory?

If you were stranded on a desert island with the basic essentials, what additional 3 things would you want to have and why?

BC – My favourite childhood memory is the blue sky above my parents flat. If I were on a desert island I would love to have a scuba diving kit. My family. And my partner of the moment – whomever I wanted to spend the rest of my life with. If it’s not people that am allowed. Additional equipment would be a kindle with a never ending memory of books. And a survival handbook.

2) xxkatyladyxx -Benedict, You must get asked many of the same questions over and over, but I’d like to know — what’s a question you WISH someone would ask? Something that matters to you about which you’d love to speak candidly? (And of course, what’s the answer to that question?)Also, thank you for sharing your immense talent and for doing this AMA. You are both well-respected and well-loved, and it’s deserved from what I can tell.

BC -Well thank you very much, first of all. I often feel in interviews people should ask about the culture and people that I engage with as an audience rather than the same bio or personal life details. Rough with the very, very smooth, these are high class problems. The best interviews evolve like conversation. They’re not lead by journalists that are seeking to thrill their editor with predictable copy and questions that are basically answers. Sadly, that’s the norm. But there are exceptions which sometimes make it worthwhile.

3) Keeblerlorien -Mr Cumberbatch, you so rarely get to do comedy these days, and you were hilarious in Starter for 10! It seems from interviews and such that you and Simon Pegg got on well while filming Star Trek. As Mr Pegg has a tendency to cast his friends in his work, is there any chance we might one day get to see you in a future Pegg comedy film?

BC -That is a question for Simon, obviously. I love my comedy and when the right project comes up I won’t shy away from it. There’s a lot of humour in what I do, specifically Sherlock, but it would be great to play a “normal guy” in a “normal comedy”.

4) Groinkick -If you make an appearance on Sesame Street, which Muppet would you like to share a scene with?

BC- Animal

jrgolden42 - But Animal isn’t a member of the Sesame Street cast!!

BC - Forgive me. Oscar the grouch.

5) Dayofthedead204 - I really enjoyed your portrayal of Khan in Star Trek Into Darkness.My question is that you’ve often portrayed some very famous literary characters, ie Sherlock Holmes, Victor Frankenstein, Smaug The Dragon, but if you could choose to be any other literary character in an upcoming role who would it be and why?

BC - Patrick Melrose in Edward St. Aubyn.

6) Wthfbk - What are you currently reading for leisure, and what is your favorite novel of all time? Also, if you could play any stage role, be it opera, musicals, or plays, who would it be?

BC - See answer to fictional character I’d like to play. I have short term ambitions.

7) alphahatter - QUICK. whats in your pocket right now?

BC – My hand.

polymercury – How are you typing?

BC – With my left foot.

Cool Scottybomber - There are millions of reasons as to why I watch Sherlock and your perfect comedic timing is most definitely one of them!

BC - Thank you. I learned from the master, Martin Freeman.

9) hcml11 - Do you, Matt Smith, and Tom Hiddleston have cheek bone polishing parties?

BC - We like nothing better than buffing our Zygoma. And imagining a horny time traveling long overcoat purple scarf wearing super sleuth nordic legend fuck fantasy. Get to work on that, internet.

shitty_watercolour - I realise this will disappoint a lot of you

BC - Phenomenal. Why does Matt have the hammer? Sure it’s the wrong household tool? Shouldn’t it be a sonic toothbrush with a screwdriver on the end of it? And what’s Simon Pegg doing staring at my abundant locks? And where’s his right hand?

10) wonkybookcase - Is fame different from how you imagined it would be?

BC – You can’t imagine fame. You can only ever see it from an outsider and comment on it with the rueful wisdom of a non participant. When it happens to you, it doesn’t matter what age or how, it is a very steep learning curve. The important thing to realize in all of it is that life is short, to protect the ones you love, and not expose yourself to too much abuse or narcissistic reflection gazing and move on. If fame affords me the type of ability to do the kind of work I’m being offered, who am I to complain about the downsides. It’s all relative. And this are obviously very high class problems. The way privacy becomes an every shrinking island is inevitable but also manageable and it doesn’t necessary have to get that way…

11) quietasashadow - Benedict, do you bother with Halloween? If so, what will you be this year?

BC - The invisible man. Oh, how I love to disappear.

12) chatchapeau - Hi Ben, what are a few of your favourite comfort movies that are nostalgic to you and you never tire of?

BC – Ghostbusters. Loads of John Hughes classics. Annie Hall. annnnnd 2001 Space Odyssey!!

13) CanadianGladiator - If I make a brand of pants called “CumberBritches” will you endorse them?

BC - Only if you get me a billboard slot in Times Square.

14) TheRedLozza - Is it hard to keep the secret of how Sherlock survived? Do you ever have the urge to tell someone? If so, how do you cope?

BC - I cry myself to sleep at night. And then wake up laughing.

15)nam5464 - Julian Assange’s open letter to you criticizing The Fifth Estate is very intense. He even goes so far as to call you a “hired gun” for distorting the truth (or at least what he views as his truth). Did this affect the way you portrayed him or even make you second guess your role at all in this film?

BC - Yes, of course it did. To have the man you are about to portray ask you intelligently and politely not to do it gave me real cause for concern, however, it galvanized me into addressing why I was doing this movie. He accuses me of being a “hired gun” as if I am an easily bought cypher for right wing propaganda. Not only do I NOT operate in a moral vacuum but this was not a pay day for me at all. I’ve worked far less hard for more financial reward. This project was important to me because of the integrity I wanted to bring to provocative difficult but ultimately timely and a truly important figure of our modern times. The idea of making a movie about someone who so far removed from my likeness or situation who brought about an ideal through personal sacrifice that has changed the way we view both social media, the power of the individual to have a voice in that space, and be able to question both the hypocrisies and wrongdoings of organizations and bodies of powerful people that rule our lives… This resonated deeply with my beliefs in civil liberty, a healthy democracy, and the human rights of both communities and individuals to question those in authority. I believe that the film, quite clearly, illuminates the great successes of wikileaks and its extraordinary founder Julians Assange. As well as, examining the personalities involved and what become a dysfunctional relationship within that organization. While the legacy of his actions and the organizations continue to evolve and only history will be the true judge of where this is leading us. The Fifth Estate is a powerful, if dramatized, entry point for a discussion about this extraordinary lurch forward in our society. I wanted to create a three dimensional portrait of a man far more maligned in the tabloid press than he is in our film to remind people that he is not just the weird, white haired Australian dude wanted in Sweden, hiding in an embassy behind Harrods. But a true force to be reckoned with, achieved the realization of the great ideal. I’m proud to be involved in tackling such a contentious character and script. There is only personal truth in my opinion, and the film should provoke debate and not consensus. It should be enjoyable and ultimately empowering to realize that Julian has spearheaded a movement that is the foundations stone of The Fifth Estate, people journalism and what that is capable of including finding out the “truth” for yourself.

punkroxmum - And this is the proof against a Benedict Twitter account

BC - Julian complex important proud to have attempted an interpretation. Film out Oct. 18 #FifthEstate

kastinsaints - and he typed that out with his left foot.

BC - I used a bit of my right, too. And my nose. My hands were busy scratching my head.

scrotumbrella - Plus you rock the fuck out of blond hair

BC - Well thank you, you’re in a much loved minority.

16) areyefantastical95 - Seeing as to how you’ve been spending a lot of time in the US, what do you find was the most baffling thing about the customs here?

BC - I find that no one at the borders ever smiles.

17) HollyboBolly - Can you feel the love tonight?

BC - I’m feeling it right now. Leave me alone.

18) Diegovoncosmo - There has recently been a debate about whether television is finally on par with film as an artistic medium. As someone who has achieved considerable success in both TV and film, what is your opinion on this matter?

BC - I think there is no debate. I agree. And thank you for your assessment of my achievements.

19) Meggo_myegg0 - Has there been a time when you’ve been completely starstruck meeting someone famous but had to play it cool because you’re famous too?

BC – Uhhhhhhhh. Every time I’ve met someone famous who I’ve been in the audience of. I have the same butterflies and inability to be cool. I approach them as a fellow member of the human race as the next person in their audience does. I’ve been doing this for 10 odd years, and so to meet people who thrilled me with their work for my entire life in such a concentrated manner as has happened over the last few years has been mind-blowing. One of the many perks of my job, I guess.

20) Ghostbunny - Have you turned down or missed out on any roles that you wish you had taken/gotten and what were they?

BC - Turned down, no. Missed out, yes. Being specific would be impolite.

21) C-line - This AMA has exceeded my wildest expectations. Has your sass increased since working with Martin Freeman, or were you always this sassy?

BC – Well of course Martin will be furious unless I say I owe it all to him. And believe me, his wrath is more fearsome than any dragons.

22) Stopxstoreytime - where has your favourite place been so far to visit?


BC – On an untouched New Zealand glacier via helicopter where I stepped out in trainers, jogging pants, and got out and danced.Or touching the earth after my first skydiving jump in Namibia. Or a balcony in South Africa where I felt the sun on my face after the night I was carjacked.

23) Cumberbatchlover - What do you think of your fans calling themselves ‘Cumbercookies’? That way when we all come together, we’ll be the ‘Cumberbatch’.

BC - It’s great! You could call yourself the Cumbergirls, and then when you come together you’d be a flock. Or you could call yourself the Cumbertadpoles and that way you’d be the Cumberspawn…Wait!…Ew! Don’t do that.

24) Thecompass – How did you find the Australian accent to mimic? I’ve heard it’s one of the more difficult ones to get right!

BC - Thanks to Sarah Shepard. I think we did Ok. She was a wonderful friend as well as help in perfecting the accent but in particular Julian’s speech patterns. And according to the Australian journalists I met in Toronto, we did a good job. I hope you agree. Thank you for your kind comments. It’s very appreciated from an Aussie. And especially one who must be almost as tired as I feel.

25) Illustrious- I don’t have a question. I just wanted to say that I think you are lovely in Sherlock and that my husband named our fish after you.

BC - I hope that fish lives a long life. Don’t put it near any rooftops.

26) Hesprit - Under protest (if I don’t write this my 15 year old daughter has said she’ll create a Reddit account, and I really don’t want her hanging out with some of the very strange people here), I am directed to say that the next time you come to Toronto you are welcome to come over for a roast beef and yorkshire pudding dinner. To subvert this message, I’m asking you to please bring a date.

BC – Thank you very much. I’ll try and create some time next time I’m over there with The Imitation Game. For some English grub with you. No promises, though.

27) Procrastinationman - HOW DID YOU SURVIVE THE FALL?! What? He told us to ask anything.

BC - Haven’t you seen winged suits on YouTube?? I told you I was into skydiving. How many more clues do you need people?

28) Mostly_harmless_42 - Any plans for working on anything for BBC Radio? I’m a huge fan of Cabin Pressure and would love to hear you all back for the last, “Z”, episode!

BC – Ask John Finnemore. He’s the writer. Hello John, if you’re out there. We love you!

29) _neverwhere - With your (crazy) filming schedule, what creature comforts do you look forward to the most when returning home?

BC - Walking or running on Hampstead Heath, seeing my friends and family, cooking for myself, and the embrace of those I love. Beyond that, a whisky, the fire and a good book.

30) FullOnPleb - What’s the weirdest encounter you’ve had with a fan?

BC – Ted Danson at a pre-Oscar party screaming across a floor of people like Leonardo DiCaprio, Ray Liotta, Kristen Stewart, Kirsten Dunst, et al while pushing past them and knocking their drinks. “OH MY GOD! OH MY GOD! IT’S FUCKING SHERLOCK HOLMES!”

31) HollyBoBolly- What was your favorite prank, done by you or to you, on or off set.

BC – Neutron cream. Come on, people!

PS. Anytime you’re in a restaurant with a group of friends and one of them goes to the restroom or bathroom (presume there are many nationalities involved in this AMA), tell the waiter that it’s that person’s birthday. Not only is it fun to embarrass the hell out of the poor victim, but you get free cake in the bargain.

32) Valkyrie_cain Japan seems to really love you. Any funny/interesting/weird or simply memorable thing that happened to you there?

BC – Being greeted by 1000 people at an airport is pretty formidable as experiences in life go. I’d love to go there again and escape on a bullet train to the South Island to see Kyoto and more spots of beauty and spots of interest. A remarkable country that has been through so much in recent time that I’m very proud to be liked by. Thank you.

33) little-lamb - what are your top 5 favorite songs?

BC – At the moment:

MS by Alt-J

Strong by London Grammar

Pretty much all of Sigur Ros’ Valtari album

One Day Like This – Elbow

Fever to the Form – Nick Mulvey

Two Fingers – Jake Bugg

I’m rubbish at counting, and favorites.

34- girthanthaclops- Mr. Cumberbatch, everyone loves you for a myriad of reasons: your personality, looks, hair, cheekbones, you name it. I was wondering, what’s your favorite part about you?

BC – I guess as an actor your eyes are vital in conveying any internal thought process or feeling, and for that I have my mum to thank. Other than that, I’m happy to default to your judgements.

35) Areyouheretokillme - My wife would sincerely like to know if you are wearing anything under your robe….. please respond, this is important for our mental wellbeing.

BC - You should be asking who’s naked under it with me.

36) Georgieorca – Nutella or marmite?

BC – Marmite

Final Update: Thank you, reddit. This has been more fun than I imagined. It’s been great to be able to reach out and speak to a few of you. Sorry for those that I didn’t get to respond to. JA bless you all. See you all the next time.
BX

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Sáb Oct 12, 2013 10:44 am


Ay,me parte el alma eso de que quiere desaperecer!
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Sáb Oct 12, 2013 12:09 pm

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Lo que me he podido reir con esta "entrevista" , es que es buenissimo y las de con que estaba escribiendo , es que este hombre tiene unas respuestas geniales jajaajajja , y cuando al final dice que ha sido mas divertido de lo que esperaba , claro pero este hombre que se cree que lo fans no tienen sentido del humor ni ingenio , hayy Ben... Ben... pero que perdido esta en la vida jajajajaajajjajajajajaj, y lo del libro electronico me ha llegado jajajajja haber Ben cariño que parte de isla desierta no has entendido , jajajajajajajjajaj donde hibas a cargar la bateria en la nariz Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  moder of god!!Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  eso si las canciones son para cortarse las venas Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes , madre mia!! Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  he de reconocer que tambien tuve mi epoca canciones cortavenas , y he de decir que no fue la mejor epoca de mi vida , asi que el dice que esta super feliz con todo pero miente descaradamente , por que la musica dice mucho de una persona y su momento animico , o es asi , o... en la ultima el niño que la canta dice que se lio uno bien gordo , pero creo que fue Ben el que se lo fumo para pillar estas canciones si no no lo comprendo de verdad Shocked Shocked Shocked 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

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