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Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Lun Feb 24, 2014 1:53 pm

JAJAAJAJAJAJAJJAJAJAJAJAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Isa!!!!!!!!! Más claro, el agua  Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz  me parto!!!!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol! 
Sí se le va un poco, una chispa el panchito jajajajaja pero el problema de este muchacho es esa verborrea que tiene, no filtra jajajajajaja este larga y larga y pierde el conocimiento y no sabe ni lo que está diciendo.
Es curioso, pero que muy curioso que el otro día a raíz de lo "feliz y en su salsa"  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  que se le veía en el desfile de Hugo Boss, comentamos en Cumberland algo muy parecido a lo que dice él.
Eso de que es una lástima que los actores tengan que meterse en estos saraos, para tener más popularidad, cuando con su talento debería ser suficiente. Viene a ser muy parecido a lo que dice de que su trabajo debería hablar de él, no él. (Señor topo, ya no es que nos conteste a las preguntas, es que nos copia las respuestas  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Suspect  Suspect  Suspect  Suspect  Suspect )
Lo de que se aburra en las promociones con las entrevistas, es que tiene que ser mortal estar un día entero recibiendo periodistas y que todos te hagan preguntas similares y a ver de dónde sacas imaginación e ingenio pera no responder lo mismo. Normal que entre en bucle y como encima no le gusta hablar, porque a él neeeehhhh que va eso de hablar no va con él  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  tiene que acabar agotado, hasta dolor de lengua tiene que tener al final de día  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz 
Pero vamos, que sí que con el tema twitter a mi me dejó toa loca, aún estoy comunicando, el "Never have been and never will" ja ja ja pero en el fondo tampoco es una sorpresa, que nos lo olíamos, vaya si nos lo olíamos  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  Razz  por eso el muchacho tampoco sabía lo que es el #setlock, claro, claro.... Nosotras que somos muy mal pensadas.....
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Abr 06, 2014 10:31 am

hellos , aqui os dejo una entrevista nueva , la verdad es que no os puedo decir de donde viene por que la he encontrado en tumblr y no tenia ninguna referencia  Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes , pero bueno es muy divertida , creo que Ben tenia un muy buen dia , ademas si es tan troll , como pensamos acaba de decir que hay hasta sexta temporada  Suspect  Suspect  Suspect  Very Happy  Very Happy .

MERTXINES: Edito para decir que la entrevista es de "The Advertiser", un periódico de Adelaide (Australia):

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BENEDICT Cumberbatch once described his name as “sounding like a fart in a bath” but after an incredible 12 months it not only resonates well beyond his bathroom but famously, too.

Star Trek, The Hobbit, 12 Years A Slav e, a Julian Assange biopic, a role opposite Meryl Steep in August: Osage County and a return as Sherlock Holmes – some are calling 2013 the year of the Cumberbatch. The man himself is just hoping we’re not all utterly sick of the sight of him by now.

The 37-year-old Londoner has become one of the most respected, versatile and in-demand actors around and it’s all there on screen in his rich and various roles from the past year.

Trekkies and Tolkienites love him, women have the hots for him and movie buffs lap up his performances, yet Cumberbatch remains unchanged by his recent success.

Right now he’s coming down from a big night at the Oscars, a Best Picture win for 12 Years A Slave and a triumphant return as Sherlock Holmes in the acclaimed BBC series Sherlock.

London’s Barbican Centre last week announced Cumberbatch would play Hamlet at the venue next year and he has been voted the most popular Sherlock ever by fans, a title that sits nicely alongside the “sexiest man” titles thrust upon him.

___

It’s all part of a side of the business that you sense the actor accepts and plays along with rather than enjoys.

Fiercely private (he refuses to talk about his past relationship with Brit actress Olivia Poulet, whom he was with for more than a decade), Cumberbatch insists he still isn’t used to all that comes with being famous – and may never be.

Here, the likeable star talks about his incredible run of good fortune in film, his star status and talking to fans.

Q The past year has been incredible for you. The Year of the Cumberbatch!

BC (Laughs) I don’t know about that! But thank you very much.

Q Do you ever get sick of seeing yourself on screen?

BC I’d hate to think anyone is sick of the sight of me, although I wouldn’t blame them. It’s just crazy. I’ve overexposed myself! Actually that sounds a bit dirty (laughs). No, it is a real high point and I’m really enjoying it. I’m proud of every single project. I can genuinely say that it is varied enough, as a slate, to not fear too much overexposure. I just hope the public agree because they are seeing a lot of me.

Q Are you getting used to all the fans and the screaming at premieres?

BC Not at all! I don’t think I’ll ever get used to that. It all feels very peculiar. My day job is standing in front of a camera, that’s true, but it’s under very different circumstances because I’m in character and I’m doing my job. I’m an actor, not a spokesperson, a political pundit or an expert. While I dabble with the ideas and try to get a handle on the subject matter to give it some integrity and depth and understanding, beyond that I try to let the work speak for itself.

Q But you are enjoying your star status?

BC I am enjoying myself, yes. It would be really churlish to complain about anything to be honest. I’m very fortunate to be in the position I’m in.

Q How was it to be involved in 12 Years A Slave and a movie that won Best Picture at the Oscars?

BC I only had a small role in that fantastic film, but just to be involved was amazing. Steve McQueen is a fantastic director. It was an intense film to work on but so rewarding and to be there at the Oscars was thrilling and a very proud moment for everyone involved.

Q There was so much secrecy surrounding your recent return as Sherlock Holmes. Is that hard to keep up?

BC It is but it’s always lovely to be back as Sherlock. He’s a character that I truly love and it’s always a treat to wear that hair again and be back with Watson.

Q You have a very close relationship with Martin Freeman who plays Watson…

BC We’re great friends and working with Martin is a joy. He’s a brilliant actor and a fantastic Watson and his performance in coping with what he believed was the death of his best friend was an integral part of where the third series started. But Martin is an adorable man and blissfully, ridiculously funny and entertaining.

Q When were you first aware of Sherlock Holmes as a character?

BC I would have been about 12 years old when I first read a Sherlock story and it immediately made me hungry for more. Those stories are just very addictive reading, and it’s an utterly absorbing world. It’s just a really rich tapestry of characters and extraordinary adventures.

Q What do you do to prepare for a return as Sherlock?

BC The character is familiar to me now, so in terms of research I don’t have to do too much. Physically, I do a little swimming and yoga. It sounds funny I suppose, but I find it helps.

Q With Sherlock, Star Trek and The Hobbit, you’ve been exposed to some of the most obsessive fans there are. What were you obsessed with growing up?

BC Not much really. I loved certain Saturday TV staples like Knight Rider, The A-Team and even Baywatch – yes I had some sophistication when I was younger (laughs).

Q When people stop you in the street, which role do they want to talk to you about?

BC It’s mostly Sherlock. Even in America it’s Sherlock I get asked about most. It’s amazing just how many people have seen it over there. I get a few Trekkies, too.

Q How does it feel to be voted one of the sexiest men in the world?

BC Erm, baffling? No, I’ve been doing this job for a long time and it’s only recently that I’ve been blessed with this incredible good fortune by way of incredible opportunities. A side effect of all that is that kind of thing and it’s as funny to me as it is flattering.

Q Will we soon be seeing the last of you as Sherlock?

BC I genuinely don’t know. That’s not me trying to be mysterious. None of us knows if there will be a fourth, fifth or sixth series.

Lo de que era muy sofisticado de joven me ha encantado jajajajajajjaja la verdad es que si , las series tenian telita jajajajaj
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Abr 06, 2014 11:32 am

Mini orgas  Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed Las fotos que nos encantaron d Ben y texto en español , que mas se puede perdir???? vale tener a Ben a tu lado leyendo , pero creo que para eso aun nos queda un poco jajaj  Razz Razz , eso si el escaneado no es muy bueno (te dejas los ojos y ...  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes  Rolling Eyes )

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Diossss !!! que las publicaciones de aqui  ya saben que Ben exsiste , feliz cual perdid estoy ahora  Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy   bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce cyclops cyclops cyclops cyclops 

pero la verdad , creo que en el precio se pasan 10000  Shocked  Shocked  Shocked 
Mr Mole thank you so sooo  much  Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy 

pd: para verlos bien ya sabeis boton derecho , abrir imagen .
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Dom Abr 06, 2014 12:40 pm

A mí no me va lo de "botón derecho, abrir imagen", no me deja hacerlo, y quería leerla Sad

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Dom Abr 06, 2014 7:40 pm

Mertxines , es la misma entrevista que la de hollywood reporter , osea esta...
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Haber si esto sirve , por probar....

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Aqui estan las 3 partes de la entrevistas , haber si puedes leerla asi  Wink  Wink  Wink
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Mar Abr 08, 2014 7:04 am

No sé si esto estaba, ni si va aquí pero como es nuevo (de lo de Australia) y lo acabo de encontrar, lo dejo:

Oz ComicCon took over the Adelaide Showgrounds this past weekend, giving geeks ample opportunities to indulge in Q&A sessions with voice artists, actors and animation artists, as well as spending up big on the multitude of stalls selling merchandise, prosthetics, clothing and more. Of course, Adelaide won out over the Perth event in a huge way, with Benedict Cumberbatch stopping by for the first of two special Australian appearances.

Closing out the Q&A sessions on Sunday, Cumberbatch drew a huge crowd in the Ridley Pavilion to the point where there was another room set up for people to view the session via simulcast. We were lucky enough to gain access to the man (and by ‘access’, I mean three rows back from his stage in a crowd of many) and were able to gain some thoughtful insights into a career that is currently one of the hottest/most talked about at the moment. From the onset, he’s charming, eloquent, hilarious and not afraid to take the piss out of the audience as much as himself. Here are some of the big things we learned from BC. Benny C. C-Batch. Or, as he would like, ‘Sir or Lord Cumberbatch of London’.

Benedict is not on social media. He’s been tempted, though.

When asked if he was aware of the widespread response to the initial screening of “The Empty Hearse” via social media, Benedict is quick to point out that he doesn’t maintain an online presence. Benedict noted that he has been tempted in the past however, whether it’s been to correct a review or misrepresentation, or to lend his support online to a certain need or charity, but he’s always drawn himself back from jumping down that rabbit hole.

“I get that it works for a lot of people…I’m just not one of those people.”

Where was he when the episode went to air, though? Watching it with his girlfriend at the time with Martin Freeman at Steven Moffatt and Sue Vertue’s house, naturally. When shit hit the fan online and fans around the world collectively lost their minds, he laughs and acknowledges the mania.

“They were like, ‘You’re trending!’ and I’m like, ‘What?! What the fuck does that even mean?!”

The famous U2 photobomb & ‘Ellen DeGenerate’ – BC on his Oscars experience…

First question out of the gate was something akin to ‘what possessed you to photobomb U2 at the Oscars?’. Apparently, an old friend of Benedict’s suggested he do it for shits and giggles and so…he did it.

“I didn’t do it because I needed the publicity…I did it to make my friends laugh back home and all of a sudden, it was on the news the next day!”

He praises Ellen DeGeneres‘ work as the Oscars host, though reveals in the same beat that she’s probably partly responsible for his drunken state seeing as she loaded him and other actors up with mini bottles of vodka on the red carpet before the ceremony even began. “Ellen DeGeneres or ‘Ellen DeGenerate’ as I called her by the end of the night…”

Like everyone else, Meryl Streep brought out his inner fan.

Working with an amazing cast on August Osage County was an experience Benedict is still notably gobsmacked over, but working alongside Meryl Streep (“She’s an epoch defining actress…”) was obviously a life moment where he proved that he was again, like the rest of us. On meeting her for the first time, he stutters “My parents are big fans of your films…but I am too, that’s not a generational thing!”

Benedict prefers Q&A settings over most other established fan interaction.

“I much prefer this if I’m honest, even over the photos and autographs…”

Clearly wanting to give every fan who he’s interacted with the time of day, Benedict admits that he enjoys this kind of Q&A environment over the many photo and autograph sessions that he’s taken part in – only because there is nowhere near enough time for him to sustain normal conversations with people when he’s got his head down and signing his name or having less than a minute for a photo with these people who have paid a lot of money to meet him.

Benedict and the Sherlock crew made Una Stubbs cry.

On playing pranks on the set of Sherlock, BC admits that there were some that were carried out, though the one that comes to mind was picking on the legendary Una Stubbs by unearthing an old advertisement she danced and took part in many years ago. Apparently she was so overcome when she discovered they’d found it, that the joke (and maybe the sight of Benedict imitating her?) went in the completely opposite direction.

“She burst into tears! Obviously that was not our intention!”

“Listen a lot.” Advice for younger actors working on perfecting different accents.

Benedict also advises young actors to not be afraid of trying on different impersonations in getting used to affecting different accents, getting a good dialect coach (obviously) and also using a dictaphone to record different sounds to practice with. He praises his coaches who he worked on during 12 Years a Slave and other films in helping him become comfortable with his dialogue and finding his ‘voice’, as it were.

Don’t ask him to say anything in his Smaug voice.

He won’t do it.

“I’m not a performing monkey…or dragon, I’m sorry!”

Tom Hiddleston is one of Benedict’s influences – cueing a rousing ‘awww’ from the fandom.

Benedict lists many personal influences, from his parents to past school teachers and headmasters, to fellow actors he’s been able to work alongside with and others who he’s specifically looked up to. Upon his brief mention of Tom Hiddleston, the crowd goes wild (just do some googling of the two of them…), but he’s quick on the ball there, waving his hand at all of us: “Oh stop it, I’m not talking about that, I’m talking about these real actors. You should be squealing as much for Rory Kinnear as much as you should for someone with the initials ‘T.H’.”

His Hamlet run was announced so far in advance so there’d be enough time for people to get used to the idea.

Set to appear onstage in 2015 as the iconic Shakespearean character, Benedict acknowledges the popularity of film/TV actors heading back to the stage and points out that he made this announcement so far in advance as to give people (‘the culture’) time to work up to it. Given there have been quite a few ‘Hamlets’ over the past five to ten years, by the time Benedict takes on the role, people will be like, ‘Yes, he is the Hamlet of this time’.

He takes on fan responses, but also tries not to let the wide opinion affect his portrayal of a character.

When asked if there are any challenges posed to him or how he prepares for a portrayal of some of the characters he’s been able to tackle over the past few years, Sherlock in particular, Benedict acknowledges the huge weight that comes with such characters as they have such a loyal fanbase behind them already. Using Sherlock as an example, he says that while the fans play a significant part in how the show is formed (‘Of course it does, otherwise we wouldn’t be sitting here…’), he also says that he tries not to base his performances on what everyone else thinks.

“We were reinventing a wheel that was so perfect in it’s original form…” he says of the BBC’s interpretation of Sherlock Holmes, and that the different directions they’ve been able to take the stories which have prompted some quite divisive responses, is all part of the show’s success.


Me edito para dejar la dirección del enlace con el título, la fecha y to:  http://iris.theaureview.com/2014/04/07/10-things-we-learned-from-benedict-cumberbatch-at-oz-comic-con-adelaide/

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Jue Abr 10, 2014 1:30 am

¿Me puede alguien decir donde puedo conseguir la revista Dapper esa?  Estuve preguntando en el Corte Inglés y otros sitios y ni la conocían.  Por cierto, la chica del Corte, que ya me conoce de otras veces por mi Benadicción, me estuvo interrogando sobre Ben para investigarlo (le tuve que deletrear el nombre para poder anotarlo, claro) de dónde es, en qué pelis sale, etc.  Se ve que ya la tengo intrigada.  Me preguntó si era de ojos rasgados y luego dijo "creo que ya se quien es, uno guapito"  lol!  lol!   Pues si, que yo estoy aquí "difundiendo la palabra"  Razz

En fin, que quien sepa donde la puedo comprar, porfa, me lo diga que me hace mucha ilusión tener, por fin, una revista en español con él en la portada.  Smile  

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Jue Abr 10, 2014 1:48 am

Yo es que no tengo idea,sólo dejaré esto aquí que he encontrado sobre ella:

Dapper
Revista trimestral líder en el sector del lujo en España, dirigida a un público de alto nivel adquisitivo, apasionado por la alta relojería y los contenidos relacionados con un estilo de vida con personalidad. Dapper es diseño sofisticado y un objeto de lujo en sí misma, con un papel y una impresión de máxima calidad. Dapper es un producto exclusivo que cuenta con la distribución más efectiva para una revista de gama alta y el apoyo de uno de los grupos editoriales más importantes del mundo.


mañana preguntaré en la zona antigua que es dónde compro yo siempre esAS COSAS Y YA TE DIGO SI LA TIENE O SABEN EN DÓNDE  Wink 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Jue Abr 10, 2014 2:40 am

Gracias Nika  Smile 

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Jue Abr 10, 2014 5:08 am

Vamos que la revista es la madre de toda las revista pijas  Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  si parece que te estan vediendo  un mercedes  Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  , vamos que tiene que dar urticaria solo hacercase a ella , quiero decir esta revista no la compraria ni Ben jajaj , bueno .... por el precio Ben es el ultimo que lo compraria y lo sabemos jajajajaajajajajajjaaj   Razz Razz



Amen hermana sherlockvictim tu difunde la palabras , haber si nos hacemos con un buen ejercito y Ben se digna a visitar españa para algun estreno al menos  Wink  Wink  Razz  Razz  
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Lun Abr 14, 2014 5:33 am

Isadora escribió:Vamos que la revista es la madre de toda las revista pijas  Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  si parece que te estan vediendo  un mercedes  Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  , vamos que tiene que dar urticaria solo hacercase a ella , quiero decir esta revista no la compraria ni Ben jajaj , bueno .... por el precio Ben es el ultimo que lo compraria y lo sabemos jajajajaajajajajajjaaj   Razz Razz



Amen hermana sherlockvictim tu difunde la palabras , haber si nos hacemos con un buen ejercito y Ben se digna a visitar españa para algun estreno al menos  Wink  Wink  Razz  Razz  

Yo la vi en Barcelona en una tienda-kiosko, la tuve en la mano, vi el precio y la solté. Ni idea de si todavía quedan...


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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Lun Abr 14, 2014 5:37 am

Entrevista en The Adelaide Advertiser del 4-4-14:


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Benedict Cumberbatch - from Sherlock to Star Trek to Oscar night sex symbol

BENEDICT Cumberbatch once described his name as “sounding like a fart in a bath” but after an incredible 12 months it not only resonates well beyond his bathroom but famously, too.

Star Trek, The Hobbit, 12 Years A Slav e, a Julian Assange biopic, a role opposite Meryl Steep in August: Osage County and a return as Sherlock Holmes – some are calling 2013 the year of the Cumberbatch. The man himself is just hoping we’re not all utterly sick of the sight of him by now.

The 37-year-old Londoner has become one of the most respected, versatile and in-demand actors around and it’s all there on screen in his rich and various roles from the past year.

Trekkies and Tolkienites love him, women have the hots for him and movie buffs lap up his performances, yet Cumberbatch remains unchanged by his recent success.

Right now he’s coming down from a big night at the Oscars, a Best Picture win for 12 Years A Slave and a triumphant return as Sherlock Holmes in the acclaimed BBC series Sherlock.

London’s Barbican Centre last week announced Cumberbatch would play Hamlet at the venue next year and he has been voted the most popular Sherlock ever by fans, a title that sits nicely alongside the “sexiest man” titles thrust upon him.

It’s all part of a side of the business that you sense the actor accepts and plays along with rather than enjoys.

Fiercely private (he refuses to talk about his past relationship with Brit actress Olivia Poulet, whom he was with for more than a decade), Cumberbatch insists he still isn’t used to all that comes with being famous – and may never be.

Here, the likeable star talks about his incredible run of good fortune in film, his star status and talking to fans.


Q The past year has been incredible for you. The Year of the Cumberbatch!

BC (Laughs) I don’t know about that! But thank you very much.


Q Do you ever get sick of seeing yourself on screen?

BC I’d hate to think anyone is sick of the sight of me, although I wouldn’t blame them. It’s just crazy. I’ve overexposed myself! Actually that sounds a bit dirty (laughs). No, it is a real high point and I’m really enjoying it. I’m proud of every single project. I can genuinely say that it is varied enough, as a slate, to not fear too much overexposure. I just hope the public agree because they are seeing a lot of me.


Q Are you getting used to all the fans and the screaming at premieres?

BC Not at all! I don’t think I’ll ever get used to that. It all feels very peculiar. My day job is standing in front of a camera, that’s true, but it’s under very different circumstances because I’m in character and I’m doing my job. I’m an actor, not a spokesperson, a political pundit or an expert. While I dabble with the ideas and try to get a handle on the subject matter to give it some integrity and depth and understanding, beyond that I try to let the work speak for itself.


Q But you are enjoying your star status?

BC I am enjoying myself, yes. It would be really churlish to complain about anything to be honest. I’m very fortunate to be in the position I’m in.


Q How was it to be involved in 12 Years A Slave and a movie that won Best Picture at the Oscars?

BC I only had a small role in that fantastic film, but just to be involved was amazing. Steve McQueen is a fantastic director. It was an intense film to work on but so rewarding and to be there at the Oscars was thrilling and a very proud moment for everyone involved.


Q There was so much secrecy surrounding your recent return as Sherlock Holmes. Is that hard to keep up?

BC It is but it’s always lovely to be back as Sherlock. He’s a character that I truly love and it’s always a treat to wear that hair again and be back with Watson.


Q You have a very close relationship with Martin Freeman who plays Watson...

BC We’re great friends and working with Martin is a joy. He’s a brilliant actor and a fantastic Watson and his performance in coping with what he believed was the death of his best friend was an integral part of where the third series started. But Martin is an adorable man and blissfully, ridiculously funny and entertaining.


Q When were you first aware of Sherlock Holmes as a character?

BC I would have been about 12 years old when I first read a Sherlock story and it immediately made me hungry for more. Those stories are just very addictive reading, and it’s an utterly absorbing world. It’s just a really rich tapestry of characters and extraordinary adventures.


Q What do you do to prepare for a return as Sherlock?

BC The character is familiar to me now, so in terms of research I don’t have to do too much. Physically, I do a little swimming and yoga. It sounds funny I suppose, but I find it helps.


Q With Sherlock, Star Trek and The Hobbit, you’ve been exposed to some of the most obsessive fans there are. What were you obsessed with growing up?

BC Not much really. I loved certain Saturday TV staples like Knight Rider, The A-Team and even Baywatch – yes I had some sophistication when I was younger (laughs).


Q When people stop you in the street, which role do they want to talk to you about?

BC It’s mostly Sherlock. Even in America it’s Sherlock I get asked about most. It’s amazing just how many people have seen it over there. I get a few Trekkies, too.


Q How does it feel to be voted one of the sexiest men in the world?

BC Erm, baffling? No, I’ve been doing this job for a long time and it’s only recently that I’ve been blessed with this incredible good fortune by way of incredible opportunities. A side effect of all that is that kind of thing and it’s as funny to me as it is flattering.


Q Will we soon be seeing the last of you as Sherlock?

BC I genuinely don’t know. That’s not me trying to be mysterious. None of us knows if there will be a fourth, fifth or sixth series.










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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  girlofBen el Lun Abr 14, 2014 6:24 am

A ver chicas, la revista la vi ayer en la estación María Zambrano de Málaga, en la parte desde dónde sale el AVE. La tuve en mis manos un segundo, porque ya salía el tren, y no tuve tiempo de ojearla ni de hojearla. Además no era plan de presentarme ante mis hijos con una revista de 12 euros , después de estar todo el día con el soniquete "no tengo dinero" cuando me pedían algo. A propósito, estuve en Torremolinos en una convención de videojuegos, la Weekend Play, porque mi hija quería conocer a un bloguero que ella sigue, el blog es "Reflexiones de un tipo con boina" y en el blog tiene una entrada sobre Sherlock, por si queréis echarle un vistazo. Es traductor audiovisual y dio una conferencia muy interesante sobre las malas traducciones de películas y series. Por la tarde había una mesa redonda y venía el doblador de Sheldon en TBBT, pero no pude quedarme. En fin, un día aprovechado, había mucha gente "cosplayada", no sé si se dice así, de la guerra de las galaxias. La verdad es que tener una hija a la que le gusta todo este mundillo entretiene un montón, jajajajaja.
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  NacarMagia el Lun Abr 14, 2014 3:24 pm

la_incondicional escribió:A propósito, estuve en Torremolinos en una convención de videojuegos, la Weekend Play, porque mi hija quería conocer a un bloguero que ella sigue, el blog es "Reflexiones de un tipo con boina" ....La verdad es que tener una hija a la que le gusta todo este mundillo entretiene un montón, jajajajaja.

Super bueno ese blog" Reflexiones de un tipo con boina". Me gustó mucho la forma de escribir descarada y sincera del Autor.  Y ojala que no me lo encuentre por el camino por que se ve  que no trae buenas pulgas-
Y si, que es rico andar  entre disfraces.
Gracias por compartirlo.
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Vie Abr 18, 2014 3:57 am

Finalmente logré conseguir la revista

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se la encargué a mi hermano que estuvo en Madrid estos días.  Si, lo se, es indecentemente cara pero no lamento haberme dado el capricho.  En cualquier caso, no había logrado leer la copia de la entrevista que colgaron aquí y está muy bien. Además me "llena de orgullo y satisfacción" ( king Razz ) ver a mi adorado tormento en la portada de una revista de lujo -y de España- como lo que es: un hombre de lujo  Smile 
Así que ahora me pesa un poco menos la cartera pero estoy  Very Happy Very Happy 

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Maddie el Vie Abr 18, 2014 4:54 am

Gracias por la recomendación del blog del tipo con boina, Srta. Incondicional  Wink aunque la primera me la he llevado en la frente al leer que Dr. Who es una "bazofia mediocre" jajajajaja... aunque como dice Isis, el tío tiene descaro escribiendo... me ha gustado la entrada sobre Sherlock  Smile 

Sherlockvictim, felicitaciones por la adquisición de la Dapper, yo ni siquiera la he visto en ningún kiosko todavía. No la compraría porque es una locura el precio, aunque estoy de acuerdo que Ben es un lujazo de hombre, para qué negarlo  king 
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Mar Abr 29, 2014 12:35 am

Bueno pues aqui os dejo la traduccion completa de la entrevista a Ben en una resvista polaca .


Fame hasn’t changed him. He does his own shopping to make dinner for his friends, without whom he cannot imagine his life. And certainly doesn’t plan on moving to Hollywood.

   You have a fantastic year behind you and equally fantastic roles ahead. Don’t you feel overwhelmed with work?

   I have to admit that I did have some trouble with too many interesting offers at once and had to turn down many of them. Although I never felt overwhelmed with work. Rather astonished by the amount of it. My record is five roles in a row in less than four months. I’ve played small parts with brilliant actors in films that were coming out in regular intervals, so I often heard: „God, you never stop working”.

   I think it’s a right opinion. You do not only play in movies, but also, for the joy of fans, came back on the set of Sherlock. What is the meaning of that part in Benedict Cumberbatch’s life?

   First of all I need to thank all of the fans, for being so patient and forgiving. They’ve found a place where we were about to be shooting and waited there for hours to at least have a word or take picture. And what did I do? I came late and instead of giving them some of my time I could only say „My schedule is very thight, but I’ll be back later to see you”. And they’ve waited three more hours, but forgave me that. It’s really incredible, but makes me feel guilty. I think a lot of these people were there because of Sherlock Holmes who became a cultural icon. It’s also a bit discouraging. I am aware that I shoud feel grateful for the trust I’m given, for all the support and loyalty. The sympathy of my fans really means a lot to me, and that’s why I’m trying to do the best I can. Obviously, there are people who don’t like my Sherlock. After all these years I got used to the varied opinions about my acting. I used to try to convince enemies to like me, but now I don’t. I think it means I’ve grown up (laughs). Playing Sherlock is many actors’ dream, as well as mine, and I was lucky enough to have it come true.

   Thanks to the series you became a sex symbol, although your character seems uninterested in the topic..

   Hmm, it is weird, shocking and… cruel. I have no doubt that Sherlock subdued all his needs, along with sexual ones, to his work. I think the opinion that he has no experience in that matter is an anathema, a total antagonysm to what is believed. Apparently fans were ok with that or wanted to comfort me and started repeating that I was sexy until they actually believed I was. I’m harder to convince, because I am a habitual doubter.

   Your parents also played in Sherlock. How did that happen?

   They’re both actors with great history in film and theater and happened to have time when the producers of the series contacted them with an offer. I dare say, no one could have done that better. They were nervous when they first arrived at set, but I was doing my best to calm them down. Later on I could only admire them getting into their roles and build relations with their on screen son. It was a surprisingly fantastic experience. In the future, I’ll be showing these episodes to my grandchildren (laughs).

   It seemed unavoidable for you to become an actor. Did you always want to follow your parents’ path?

   I didn’t want to at all. I was trying hard, though not for a long time, not to become an actor. I wanted to be a lawyer, to defend people in criminal cases. I quickly realised how hard I’d have to work and how little I’d get in return. How often I’d be left wandering between one law firm and another, without an idea of when I’d have my next time off. I’ve met a lot of lawyers who kept telling me „Go back while you still can”. I though they probably knew what they were talking about and changed my plans.

   What was your parents’ reaction when they heard about those plans? Were they excited?

   No, they worked really hard to provide me with education allowing me to become something else. They managed to get succesful carreers, but wanted something better for me. They knew upsides and downsides of the job, knew it’s dangers and didn’t want me to suffer. I somehow managed to convince them, that acting was my destiny. They lend me money for an acting school. I paid off my dept with the very first money I earned and that made me feel extremely proud. You always have to pay off your debts. I always do. It’s one of the wise things my parents taught me.

   Have you ever considered giving up acting?

   I did. Oh, you seem surprised.

   I am. When was that?

   Right after finishing college. It was six months when I couldn’t escape one thought: „You don’t have talent, you’re going to make a fool of yourself”. I doubted my abilities and was really close to giving it up. It’s been a long time until I believed in myself and realised I wasn’t a duffer.

    Did you get any proffesional advise from your parents?

   They gave me plenty of advise, but on the acting matter they only gave me suggestions of what was important and what wasn’t. They rightly assumed that as I myself decided to be an actor , I also had to work my own way into the bussiness.

   The best piece of advice you’ve ever gotten?

   It’s hard to pick the best one. Let me think… Ok, I know. Don’t spend too much time with journalists armed with voice recorders (laughs). That’s a really wise one. And one more. Never order salmon in restaurants (laughs).

   Ok, let’s get more serious. Do you feel pression, playing the most intelligent man in the world?

   Sherlock’s considered the most intelligent man in the world? I think it’s what he thinks of himself, but it’s not necessarily true. Pression? I don’t feel it because I work with a team of world’s most intelligent screenwriters and what you see on the screen is parroting their and Doyle’s brilliance. Intelligence is an interesting feature, that can take many forms.

   Back to the topic: fans. When did you first feel your popularity interfere in your privacy?

   First I need to clear something up. I still use public transport. In London I often ride a motorcycle and the helmet gives me anonymity. I do my own shopping instead of making my servants do it for me. And I certainly don’t sit on top of an ivory tower rounded with guns pointed at the streets (note from me: somebody please draw that last one). Returning to the question, the first time I realised that something was off, was when I went to Sainsbury’s, asked for a chicken and got no reply, because the young man I talked to was staring at me with his mouth open. I repeated my question to no result and went to find someone else. He followed me, so I asked about the chickens again. He showed me where they were and asked „You’re from the telly, right?” „Yes, I’m an actor” I replied. Then he started running around the store, shouting „Oh God, he’s an actor!”. I spent the next half an hour chatting with him and his friends, taking pictures and getting hungrier. That was the first time I’ve thought to myself „Jesus, I do stuff that other people watch”. Simultaneously I’ve decided to do anything it takes not to subordinate my life to popularity. I highly value my privacy, peace and freedom to say what I think without constraints.

   Don’t you think about moving to Hollywood?

   Not at all. I admire James McAvoy. He’s such a brilliant actor, that work comes to him, not the other way round. He goes to the States only when he needs to, but he doesn’t want to move there and analyze his script choices while waiting for new scripts by the pool. I think when you once decide to move there, you’re going to stay, and I never wanted to live in Hollywood. I always wanted to have enough freedom to travel for work, but always come back to London, where my friends and family are .

   How do you spend your free time between one work and another?

   I started to value peaceful moments with the people I love or with a good book. Every time I have a break, my friends and family know about it immidiately. They know how much I need those meetings in the kitchen and long conversations with a glass of wine.

   Speaking of wine. You’re said to be a connoisseur.

   Well, wine is one of the pleasures I like to spend some money on. Especially when I’m having friends over. Then instead of buying a 15£ bottle, I get one for 40 or 50 pounds. Though it’s not so that I can say „Hey, look at that really fancy wine I have”. I do it for the pleasure of sharing something good with other people. Also, let me add, that I never was a lone drinker. It happened once, that I drank more than a glass, not to leave the wine in the bottle. I fell ill and regreted it the next day, so that was the last time it happened. And I certainly don’t consider myself a wine connoisseur. Rather a beggining practitioner of the fine art of wine tasting (laughs).


 lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol! 

El momento pollo en el super tuvo que ser de lo mas subrealista jajajajajja

That was the first time I’ve thought to myself „Jesus, I do stuff that other people watch”.

jajajajajaajaj XD XD XD  diosss !! jajajaj de verdad Ben ?? y nosotras que creiamos que los actores hacian trabajos para dejarlo en una estanteria jajajajajajaj este es nuestro nene  Cool  Cool 


I highly value my privacy, peace and freedom to say what I think without constraints.

 cheers  cheers  cheers  cheers  Y lo hace , de eso no nos cabe la menor duda  Very Happy  Very Happy .


It happened once, that I drank more than a glass, not to leave the wine in the bottle. I fell ill and regreted it the next day, so that was the last time it happened.

 lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol!  lol! 

Claro por eso ahora en las partis se bebe hasta el agua de los floreros para no ponerse malito , hayy todo sea por la salud jajajajajajajajajjaajajajjajajajjjajaj  Razz  Razz .

Este hombre es el mejor   Very Happy  Very Happy  Very Happy  I love you  I love you  I love you 

pd: ya vereis como suben las ventas en Sainsbury's , sobre todo en pollos jajajajajajajajja
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Mar Ago 19, 2014 11:03 am

Esto no es una entrevista , es mas bien una reseña pero creo que este es el mejor sitio


ACTOR Benedict Cumberbatch visited patients at the Sue Ryder hospice in Nettlebed while making a new film.

The Sherlock star plays the lead role in The Imitation Game, which tells the story of how British mathematician Alan Turing helped crack the Enigma code during the Second World War.

The film, which also stars Keira Knightley and Charles Dance, will be released in November.

The hospice served as the iconic Bletchley Park, the secret code-breaking centre where Turing and his colleagues deciphered German messages.


Healthcare assistant Linda Miller introduced Cumberbatch to patients in between shoots.

She said: “It was lovely seeing Benedict chat to the patients. He said he felt humbled being in such a caring place.

“Afterwards patients chatted about the experience for ages and relatives said they were looking forward to seeing the film as it would remind them of the time their loved one was at Nettlebed, even if they were no longer with us.”

Staff nurse Sue Hollands, who was on duty when Cumberbatch and Allen Leech, who plays suspected Soviet spy John Cairncross, visited, said: “There was a real buzz about the place as patients and staff felt quite excited about the filming. The actors took their time to talk to patients and were not starry at all — they were genuinely interested in the patients and took a lot of time to chat to them and the staff on the ward.

“Benedict Cumberbatch was an absolute sweetheart.”

Dance, who plays codebreaker Alastair Denniston, chatted to patients in day therapy and met day therapy manager Lynn Brookes and healthcare assistant Caroline Dixon.

Pam Chatfield, palliative care servies manager. said: “The staff and patients enjoyed having the filming going on and although there was some disruption to our routine it was, for the most part, welcome.

“The income generated from the hospice being used as a film set helps us to care for patients and their families and loved ones.”

Filming at Joyce Grove, a Jacobean-style manor built for merchant banker Robert Fleming in the 1900s, took place over two weeks in September. The great hall, Fleming Room and former library as well as the grounds were all used in scenes.

The film crew built a wooden hut on site to resemble one of the famous huts at Bletchley Park where the codebreakers worked.

Moira Logie, regional fund- raiser for Sue Ryder, said: “It’s a British story about Bletchley Park known to a lot of patients who are in their seventies and eighties.

“A lot of patients came down to watch and they adored it. It was wonderful — you’d hang out of the window and could see Benedict Cumberbatch marching up and down.

“The cast and crew were very sensitive to the fact we’re a hospice and always very accommodating.”

Shelley Hoffmire, 55, from Oxford, saw filming taking place while attending a fund-raising sale in the grounds of the hospice, where the crew bought clothes for use as costumes in the film.

She returned a few days later to see some more and watched Cumberbatch in a scene at the main gates.

She said: “Joyce Grove is a perfect location because it’s relatively quiet and private during the week and the home and grounds are lovely.

“All the film crew brought were people dressed in costumes and old trucks. Otherwise they had a perfect Forties location for what seemed like very little effort.”

Turing killed himself in 1954, two years after being prosecuted for gross indecency after he fell foul of the anti-gay laws of the time. The conviction meant he lost his security clearance and had to stop his codebreaking work.

He received a posthumous royal pardon in December last year when the Government said he had undoubtedly shortened the war and saved thousands of lives.

Benedict Cumberbatch visits patients while filming at Nettlebed hospice.



Hayyyy por favor que lovely si es que me lo como  I love you I love you I love you I love you .
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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Lun Sep 08, 2014 10:33 pm

Entrevista en The Daily Beast (8-9-14):

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Benedict Cumberbatch on ‘The Imitation Game,’ Homophobia, and How to Combat ISIS

The Sherlock Emmy winner is back in the awards mix in a fantastic biopic on Alan Turing, the British codebreaker who helped win WWII—only to be imprisoned for being gay.

“Did you know that it was an openly gay Englishman who’s responsible for winning World War II?” asks a distraught Ned Weeks, an openly gay crusader in the HBO adaptation of The Normal Heart. “Why don’t they teach any of that in schools?”

His name was Alan Turing, and during World War II, the math prodigy led a team of cryptanalysts and codebreakers at Hut 8—a sector of the UK’s Government Code and Cypher School. Turing’s team was ultimately responsible for cracking the German Enigma code, thereby granting the Allied Forces access to once-indecipherable Nazi dispatches detailing the location and activities of the Germany navy. The intercepted messages helped the Allied troops defeat Germany, and Winston Churchill would later confess that Turing made the single biggest contribution to the war effort.

You won’t find him in many history books because, in 1952, Turing was convicted of “indecency” for being a homosexual—then a crime in the UK. He was given the choice of two years in prison or oestrogen injections, tantamount to chemical castration. He chose the latter. Two years later, at the age of 41, the war hero ended his own life with cyanide.

Turing is brought to thrilling, devastating life by Benedict Cumberbatch in Morten Tyldum’s The Imitation Game, which will make its premiere at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival. It’s a worthy tribute to one of history’s forgotten heroes, and should spell more awards glory for the ever-versatile Cumberbatch, who’s fresh off an Emmy win for the BBC miniseries Sherlock. Tyldum’s film chronicles Turing’s life, from his early days as a bullied schoolboy to his heroism during World War II and the horrifying witch-hunt that broke his spirit.

The Daily Beast sat down with Cumberbatch at TIFF for a wide-ranging discussion on the legacy of Turing, a homophobic incident that left the actor scarred, and much more.

Alan Turing is someone who has, by and large, not been entirely scrubbed from the history books, but certainly doesn’t have a prominent place in them.

He’s not as prominent as he should be. That’s the tragedy isn’t it, really? You have a guy whose life he cut off himself at 41.

There are different schools of debate on that though, right? Some conspiracy theorists believe he might have been offed due to the confidential knowledge he possessed, while others, like his mother, believe it was accidental.

This is my penny’s worth about that. Obviously, he was involved with very, very important, secretive work at Bletchley Park at the time of his death, and like Mark Strong’s character Mingus says in the film, “There will be other wars,” and the fact that we cracked this code this time, if people knew about that, we’d have to destroy almost everything. With all of the secretiveness, of course there’s potential for a conspiracy theory, because MI6 thought he might be dangerous, but I think that’s pooey. The only thing that’s in contention, really, is whether he died by accident or on purpose. His suicide note is framed to make it look like an accident. His coroner’s report said that it was a solution of cyanide and water, and then there was a bite of the apple. I think he made it look like it could potentially look like an accident so his mother wasn’t disgraced by the idea that her son committed suicide. She was already in denial about his sexuality.

He would’ve definitely played a larger role in the history books if the crazy homophobic witch-hunt after hadn’t happened. And the fact that Turing was only posthumously pardoned by the Queen late last year is pretty insane.

It’s disgusting. It gets me very, very angry.

The petition to pardon Turing was actually shot down in 2012 by Lord McNally, then Justice Minister.

Who’s Lord McNally? Well, he’s probably gay. They’re always the biggest homophobes. That’s shocking, but sadly not in ways that still have echoes of what that period was about—this deluded paranoia that everyone who was homosexual was immediately a communist. It was the same witch-hunt with us. Being homosexual was a massive red flag—no pun intended, but pun intended. That world of men living in secret about their sexuality was an incredibly clandestine place, which made it a very rich and fertile ground to accrue spies from—because their entire lives were held in secret. It’s like the radicalization of young Muslims now—things work in close proximity, and it spreads by word of mouth. If you have people of the same ilk side-by-side, that’s the best way to spread a secret. You don’t want it publicized, and you have to do a great deal of subterfuge. Being a homosexual in that era was considered morally repugnant, punishable, and curable.

The scenes of Turing undergoing the chemical castration are really gut wrenching.

And it’s still going on in North America with the Christian far right! There are courses and doctors and meds handed out to “cure” people of their homosexuality, and it’s shocking that it still goes on. It’s also shocking that any time there’s any kind of hardship, the minorities are immediately scapegoated—and that includes homosexuals in Russia, the Golden Dawn in Greece. The Golden Dawn came out of a financial crisis and people wanted answers, and the minute you start stirring up nationalistic feelings, minorities are the first people to get it because they’re the easiest to scapegoat. It’s terrifying.

There’s still a lot of homophobia in the U.S., as well.

Oh, the Christian far right? Yes. Very homophobic. You need to have a female president next, and then after that, a gay president. That’s the full journey from Obama’s legacy onwards. There’s a great Morrissey lyric from “America Is Not the World” from You Are the Quarry that goes, “In America, the land of the free, they said / And of opportunity, in a just and truthful way / But where the president is never black, female or gay, and until that day / You’ve got nothing to say to me, to help me believe.” It’s quite an old song from before Obama took office, but you’ve done black, then you need to do female, then the next, gay.

Did you ever have any experiences with homophobia? Bearing witness to it?

In an all-male boarding school, in the olden days, it was seen as being something that “just happened” since there were no girls, so you had a bit of an experience. But there was incredible homophobia at my school, to the point where two boys who were caught doing something were literally chased down the street.

I was 18. Two boys who were just discovered in bed together doing something, and it was shocking. I was just finishing an essay in the school dining hall at breakfast, and I looked out the window and heard a commotion, a pair of feet scampering by, and then a horde just charging after shouting, “Wankers! Faggots!” and I thought, “What the fuck is going on?” I asked these kids coming back from the house who were breathless from the hunt, “What are you doing you insane idiots? What the fuck?” They explained it, and I said, “And you’re a Sikh, you’re Jewish, and you’re from Kenya. Do you want to just sit down and talk about the strife that your people have suffered because of your religion, race, creed, or color? I mean, fuck me! You’ve really got to wake up to the fact that the world is full of disgusting prejudice because we are all different from one-another. You have to learn acceptance at this school, and you have to go into the world as a better person, and you have to try and embrace the fact that people are different rather than defining yourself by not being like them. Who cares that they’re gay? You have to coexist.

That’s also a good song—“Coexist” by The xx. But another way this film is very relevant to today, in addition to gay rights, is the idea of the hacker, or “disrupter,” as outsider. Two of the biggest of those, Julian Assange and Edward Snowden, are currently persona non grata in much of the western world.

True. In exile in Russia, poor Edward Snowden. It’s interesting: Outsiders are becoming mainstream. That’s the truth. You see it in culture, as well. Bryan Singer’s X-Men series is an entire celebration of what oppressed minorities are capable of. I think that’s a really healthy thing that’s happening in our culture. We have a lot more unlikely heroes now. It’s not just the guy with guns—it’s the guy with brains.

Well, the powers that be have never liked “disrupters.” Hell, Jesus was a disrupter. They’re all about social order and maintaining the status quo.

There are some sides of it that are really bad.

Like all this hacking going on.

Yeah. I think invasions of privacy are not to be tolerated. At the same time, that’s a much more complicated question because sometimes, by revealing truths, we understand better what truths are being kept from us and therefore how undemocratic our seeming democracy is. It’s a balancing act. You have to respect certain rules of law and progressive means of facilitating change from other avenues. If you rebel and throw all principles out the window, you lose traction. Intelligence-gathering isn’t always the bad thing to do, and if you’ve got people on the ground who are part the movement who could help us understand ISIS better instead of…


…just saying “let’s bomb the shit out of them.”

Yeah. A retired intelligence officer was talking today about how we should let returning Jihadis regain entrance into the UK. Why wouldn’t we want to learn from them what the hell is going on over there? What made them want to do it? Who recruited them, and how to stop the recruiting? What, we just shut the problem out? Yes, I understand that it stems from a security concern that one of those returning radicals could then carry a bomb onto public transport, but if it’s managed—and I think with those who are known, how could it not be managed?—how would we not benefit from them being reabsorbed back into our culture?

You mentioned ISIS, and you’ve done some work with the Stop the War Coalition in the UK, which protested against the Iraq War. ISIS is it seems, to a degree, a byproduct of the crap job we did in Iraq.

It really is. The usual means of showing your prowess and strength just won’t work with this. You can’t kill an idea with bombs—in fact, you often strengthen ideas with bombs. To really understand [ISIS] is how we’re going to be able to start combating it, and changing it. Although, I think there’s nothing else in the world that would make any right-minded person want to be totally opposed. If there was conscription and I was asked, I would go, because it’s fundamental to every person’s ideology on this planet, no matter what race or creed you are. It’s their way, or death. That’s as clear-cut a divide in morality and principles as we’ve faced with fascism in the Second World War, and we haven’t really had a uniting common understanding in something that’s so the polar opposite to what’s sacred in life than that, really. It’s a form of ethical and moral genocide, as well as the idea of race. It’s about killing everyone who doesn’t believe—even Muslims who don’t believe in the same extremity of what they believe in. It’s astonishing, and terrifying, and needs to be opposed. But, I do think the smart way of doing it is to understand it totally first.

The two performances everyone’s talking about at the festival are you as Alan Turing, and Eddie Redmayne as Stephen Hawking. There’s an interesting connection there because Hawking was one of the bigger celebrities that lent his name to a Telegraph op-ed demanding that Turing be pardoned posthumously.

And I played Stephen, as well. Eddie even texted me from Harrow, my old school, underneath a chalkboard with my name on it while he was dressed as Stephen Hawking. It was one of the most surreal, hall-of-mirrors experiences I’ve had of the past year.

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Vie Sep 26, 2014 7:49 am

Gente,os dejo la entrevista que le hacen al nene este mes en la revista de cine EMPIRE de octubre de 2014,con motivo de el estreno de The imitation game
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y esta páginade la GQ española,haciendole un homenaje a nuestro Ben Very Happy

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Vie Oct 03, 2014 2:31 am

Dejo para la posteridad  Laughing  la entrevista de Time Out que no estaba.  En spoiler para ahorrar espacio

Entrevista aqui:
Benedict Cumberbatch interview: ‘I’m not an overnight success’
He’s played Pitt the Younger, Julian Assange and Stephen Hawking – now Benedict Cumberbatch is starring as Alan Turing in ‘The Imitation Game’
By Dave Calhoun Tue Sep 30 20140
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©️ Dale May

It’s 7.15 on a Saturday morning, and Benedict Cumberbatch is trying but failing to leave his Hampstead home and jump into a car to the airport. He keeps forgetting stuff, running back in, grabbing more things. ‘I’m useless at getting into a car. I always think of five things I have to have before I leave. It’s like threshold anxiety!’ This early hour is the only part of the day when the 38-year-old has a decent amount of time to talk, and he’s on the phone with me all the way to the check-in desk, talking fast about everything he’s up to.

Most recently, he’s been recording the voice of the tiger Shere Khan for Andy Serkis’s new film of ‘The Jungle Book’ and rehearsing his role as Richard III in a series of upcoming Shakespeare plays for the BBC. Today he’s catching a flight to Toronto for the film festival where he will introduce ‘The Imitation Game’, a film in which he plays wartime hero Alan Turing, the mathematician who helped break the Nazi Enigma code and then faced postwar persecution because of his sexuality. The film opens the London Film Festival next Wednesday and is already being mentioned in the same breath as the Oscars. If anyone in cinema is on a high right now, it’s the actor once known as ‘that guy in “Sherlock”’.

So, here we are, at the crack of dawn on a Saturday, talking shop. Something tells me you’re busy these days. Are you good at juggling so many jobs?
‘I’m chuckling wryly because me getting out the door this morning was like a child who’s never travelled before – having something like a panic attack about not having the right pacifier or teddy. Honestly, it’s not that I’m being reduced to some spoilt, pampered celebrity; it’s just the anxiety of having a brain full of work. I have about four work heads on while leaving the house.’

Can you cope?
‘Am I able to do it? When I get to Toronto I need to find a dark, lonely corner in the airport and literally just breathe and meditate for ten minutes to clear my head. But I can. That’s the thing. As long as I get enough rest and keep fit and healthy, I seem to be all right at compartmentalising; I’m also getting much better at prioritising – those are the two secrets really.’

Last year you were the villain in a blockbuster, ‘Star Trek Into Darkness’, and then worked with Steve McQueen on the Oscar-winning ‘12 Years a Slave’. Do you feel an urge to work as much as you can now in case it all ends?
‘No, I think that’s a big mistake, as you screw yourself into the ground if you do that. My diary may be full until 2016, but I’m doing things that I choose carefully. And the most important thing is being able to make sure it continues. I’m not an overnight success, I’ve been doing it for 12 years. It’s been lovely and varied so far, but not all at this level. It’s odd, isn’t it? This business we’re in is all about the moment. But there is stuff that continues, like “Sherlock”, and my production company, which I’m building. Then I’ll be doing “Hamlet” at the Barbican for three months straight next year.’


Are you already thinking about your Hamlet?
‘The great secret is to think about it a lot before. I approached Lyndsey Turner to direct me about a year ago. We took three months to decide on a venue. It’s been a gorgeous, long runway and we already spend days looking at the play and talking about it. We’re treating it like a new play at the Royal Court. It helps push any anxiety about other Hamlets I’ve known far from my mind.’

You play Alan Turing in ‘The Imitation Game’. What is it about him that resonated with you?
‘I’d keep hearing: “Oh, Alan Turing? Wasn’t he something to do with Bletchley Park? Didn’t he create the Apple logo? Didn’t he bite an apple?” But not many people know the whole story, that he invented the computer, broke the Enigma code, was prosecuted for being a homosexual and underwent a year of oestrogen injections before dying in 1954. The irony and sickness of it was extraordinary! He wasn’t shouting from the rooftops or trying to start a cause, he was just a man who was gay. He’s such a quiet hero.’

There’s humour in the film too – in how your Alan Turing takes everyone so literally.
‘He’s so endearing as he has a zero-filter policy with language. He sees it as an utter logical construction. Sometimes it looks like he’s being a provocative eejit, but he’s just being true to who he is. The danger is that we’re putting someone who’s slightly on the spectrum in social situations and finding him funny. It’s not that. He doesn’t have the sociopathic thing that Sherlock Holmes has, where it’s just a complete disregard for anyone’s importance or intelligence but his own.’

You compare him to Sherlock…
‘Because people do, and will. If I’m playing someone who’s smart, suddenly every character I’ve played is smart. If I’m playing a bad guy, every character is a bad guy. I suppose it’s that thing where people want to see a through-line to understand you. I mean, you know, I have played pretty ordinary people too.’

Your character in ‘12 Years a Slave’ was very different. What was it like at the Oscars last year when the film won Best Picture?
‘Oh god, I had a ridiculously good time. I was a little nervous, but then I got there and, like everything on screen, it was smaller than you expect it to be. I felt like I crashed the party a bit.’

You were snapped jumping up behind U2 on the red carpet.
‘Yes, I photobombed U2! But that was all Ellen DeGeneres’s fault because she plied everyone with vodka on the red carpet. Her team was handing out these miniatures. A friend really wanted me to get a photo with U2. So I just saw the opportunity and I’ve never felt an impulse like it. I spotted them all standing around and I thought: Perfect! It wasn’t preordained or anything. I just did it.’


How was the ceremony?
‘I sat next to Brad and Angelina, and they were treating me like anybody [else]. They said: “You know, Benedict, this can be pretty tiresome.” Then after the second award we were up on our feet and dancing to Pharrell. We had a lot of fun. I think Ellen DeGeneres cracked it. And then to win. Oh my god. To be there for that was just amazing.’

I saw that you recently took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge very seriously. You did it several times and made a whole short film of it.
‘Yes, I chose all the shots and rehearsed it with my niece – who acted as my director of photography! The first time we tried it she’d stopped filming and I had to do it all over again. I got a cut above my eyebrow from the ice.’

You did it several times.
‘Yes, well, Tom Hiddleston had done it once, and then the Internet was asking when I was going to do it and if I’d wear a white T-shirt apparently. And I actually did wear a white T-shirt for the last one, which they [the fans] were apparently quite happy about, so I was saving the Internet! My agent rung me about it first. I was all: ice bucket what? And I was in the middle of doing Shere Khan and some voice work for “The Hobbit” and something else. Then I cottoned on to what it was and what it was in aid of and I thought: I need to do this properly. I was late and had been nominated more than once so I did it a few times.’

Your nominations were interesting: the producer Harvey Weinstein, Kylie Minogue and Lewis Hamilton. Why them?
‘I thought it was a bit grubby: how far can you cast your celeb friends net? But I wanted a really diverse set of people. I thought Hollywood in general would thank me for throwing ice on Harvey, who’s game. Then Kylie’s just really game and sport and super sweet, and that sent it into the world of music. Then I was bringing it back to the British thing with Lewis Hamilton.’

‘The Imitation Game’ is already being talked about in Oscar terms, and Harvey Weinstein, who loves Oscar campaigns, is putting it into cinemas in the US. Are you ready for the work that goes into that?
‘I’m not even sure I’m available for the work that has to go into that.’

Have you told Harvey Weinstein?
‘Oh yeah, we’ve had a few conversations, but it doesn’t seem to have registered. I still get calls about flying to America to do half an hour on a talk show. Harvey and I are friends because we want the same thing. He’s so smart, he’s brilliant. But the most important thing is that people see the film. The minute there’s a buzz about any film, the word “hype” arises and it pours water all over the flame. I just want people to see it and judge for themselves.’

‘The Imitation Game’ opens the London Film Festival on Oct 8 and opens in UK cinemas on Nov 14.

Watch the ‘The Imitation Game’ trailer

Read more about ‘The Imitation Game’

4/5
You won’t need anything like Turing’s powers of detection to understand what the energetic, respectable ‘The Imitation Game’ has to offer. Its various riffs on codes, whether moral, sexual, societal or German, are plain to see rather than enigmatic or enlightening. Luckily it’s all anchored in a storming performance from Cumberbatch: you’ll be deciphering his work long after the credits roll.

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Sáb Oct 11, 2014 4:57 am

Encontré el vínculo para la entrevista de la revista Empire y lo dejo aquí porque está muy bien, es un poco larga pero está excelentemente....traducida al español.  Gracias a la gente de México.

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  NacarMagia el Sáb Oct 11, 2014 4:04 pm

sherlockvictim escribió:Encontré el vínculo para la entrevista de la revista Empire y lo dejo aquí porque está muy bien, es un poco larga pero está excelentemente....traducida al español.  Gracias a la gente de México.

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  aliciauk el Dom Oct 12, 2014 1:26 am

Muchas gracias Sherlockvictim Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

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Re: Entrevistas y cuestionarios de prensa a Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Dom Oct 12, 2014 1:54 am

De nada. Smile

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