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Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  **The.womaN** el Lun Sep 02, 2013 8:46 am

Isa88 escribió:
lulyve escribió:
Isa88 escribió:Aqui os dejo el enlace a un articulo , es de un periodico chileno ( encontrado por , the woman Wink )

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Por favor alguien que me explique , que es un combo??? que dijo sobre las sin carne , el periodista??, y sobre todo por que le cae tan mal a esta periodista Ben ??? con lo mono que es jajajajjjajajaajjajj, es que lo pone que parece que es mas egolatra que madonna y Paris hilton juntas Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes  y vale que un poco si que lo es , pero es que si no no podria ser actor .



Más bien parece que quien ha escrito el artículo no sabe mucho acerca de él, es como si le hubiera tocado en la rifa del reparto de artículos de la mañana y se ha limitado a escribir lo que puede ser más llamativo, pero sin profundizar demasiado.
No tengo ni idea de lo que será combo, igual le regaló una colección de pelis de Keira jejeje
Pero vamos lo de los ojos verdes???? y pequeños affraid affraid affraid affraid affraid  me ha llegado al alma..... estos ojos ¿Son verdes y pequeños? scratch scratch scratch scratch 
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JAJAJAJAJ!! pues lo mismo si , le dijo ... venga toma las pelis de piratas del caribe y callete un rato jajajajajajajajaja, y los de los ojos pequeños es segun el corte de pelo que lleve ,  hace ese efecto optico por ejemplo con sherlock, pero "normal" tiene unos ojazos
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eso si lo de verde se lo a sacado de la manga por no decir de otro sitio Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes 
Gracias por poner el post donde se debía Smile(como no me paso mucho por acá a veces me pierdo un poco Razz )
Un combo es un golpe de puño, aunque podría haber sido lo de las pelis xD Wink 
Concuerdo con que el periodista es un ignorante acerca de Ben...¿ojos verdes y pequeños? por Dios este hombre tiene unos ojazos hermosos (no solo los ojos tongue )...y hacerlo ver como un divo cuando es uno de los actores más amables y caballerosos que he visto Rolling Eyes Mad
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Mar Sep 03, 2013 3:14 am

**The.womaN** escribió:
Gracias por poner el post donde se debía Smile(como no me paso mucho por acá a veces me pierdo un poco Razz )
Un combo es un golpe de puño, aunque podría haber sido lo de las pelis xD Wink 
Concuerdo con que el periodista es un ignorante acerca de Ben...¿ojos verdes y pequeños? por Dios este hombre tiene unos ojazos hermosos (no solo los ojos tongue )...y hacerlo ver como un divo cuando es uno de los actores más amables y caballerosos que he visto Rolling Eyes Mad

Ok , es que algunas palabras se me escapan y no se lo que significan Embarassed , me lo he imaginado y... jajajajajajjajajajajajaj es te hombre tiene un alma , antigua increible Shocked Shocked  dfendiendo a una señorita de un agravio jajajajjajajja , muy fuerte pero bueno ese es Ben Very Happy Very Happy 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Miér Sep 11, 2013 6:12 am

Artículo de hoy en Los Angeles Times referente a Benedict y a su paso por el festival de Toronto:

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TIFF 2013: A bounty of Benedict Cumberbatch performances

Benedict Cumberbatch discusses playing Julian Assange in 'The Fifth Estate,' roles in '12 Years a Slave,' 'August: Osage County.'

TORONTO — Catching up with Benedict Cumberbatch at the Toronto International Film Festival is a bit of a sprint.

He's here with a cluster bomb of rich performances in three prestige films: an Internet rebel in "The Fifth Estate," a plantation owner in "12 Years a Slave" and an emotionally unsettled grown son in "August: Osage County." Besides making room in a packed schedule to chat about the quintessential Cumberbatch characters, he's also being followed by rabid fans, which he's charming enough to acknowledge is still "a bit thrilling," and rampant rumors.

It was his brilliantly deft handling of a modernist Holmes in the BBC series "Sherlock" that brought Cumberbatch the first wave of serious attention. It's a vocal, radical, international group of fans and the actor finds himself amused that anyone is all that interested in "how I behave, who I'm behaving with."

Only a day into the fest, word surfaced that he'd traded the high-end horror of "Crimson Peak" to step into the lead in the Amazon intrigue of "Lost City of Z" for Brad Pitt. Meanwhile, the will-he-or-won't-he Sith Lord question continues to circle. A "Star Wars" studio source I bumped into Friday said, "definitely not." But then "definitely not" was the party line on Khan, so I hold on to the hope that we might see a lightsaber in his hands.

I say that because Cumberbatch is so very, very good at being bad. "Maybe it's that I bring good to the bad," he laughs, settling in for a conversation about Julian Assange, the WikiLeaks founder at the center of "The Fifth Estate" — a role that's tossed Cumberbatch's name into the Oscar race.

For a time this year, the actor's re-engineering of the genetically amped-up Khan in "Star Trek Into Darkness" stood as possibly his best use of extreme measures. A man unhinged by his own unique abilities, as Cumberbatch put it.

Constructing the flaws in specific terms, the actor believes, is some of the most important prep work he does. He's always searching for the humanity in even the worst of the lot.

"I try to find why the actions may have a point, so people can at least see or empathize with the intentions or motivations," the 37-year-old British actor explains. "With Khan, he's a terrorist. But one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter."

Which is, in a sense, exactly how one might think of Assange. Cumberbatch absorbs the essence of the WikiLeaks founder so completely in "The Fifth Estate" you half expect him to show up with that startling shock of white hair, that haunted, hunted look.

He doesn't, of course. He's back to a rich auburn that is natural and the close-cropped style he favors. On this day, in fact, Cumberbatch is a study of warmth. A wardrobe of caramel and chocolate colors put together with a casual precision that suits him.

There's a warm smile, easy laugh, and literally a glow when he talks of mum, dad, his childhood, his friends, all the things that keep him grounded while he's moving at dizzying speeds on the professional front. The son of actors, Cumberbatch began his own tour of duty on stage around 8, a creative outlet for his excessive energy.

In the "Fifth Estate," Cumberbatch's task is to do to Assange what Assange did to corporations, governments and institutions: expose what's behind the public face. Though the movie has its issues, Cumberbatch has never been as artful in revealing the calculations of an uncommon mind.

The actor sees Assange as more antihero than villain — a serial interrupter of the status quo, opening one can of worms after another, WikiLeaks his bully pulpit.

"What we see is a very strong front man for a very powerful, complex cause," Cumberbatch says. "There's reams of footage of him arguing, defending, debating his position and then, did you see the John Farnham video?

He's referring to Assange's parody of the Aussie pop singer — a YouTube sensation the moment it landed in late August. It features Assange in a mullet belting out the Farnham hit "You're the Voice." "There I was struggling to give the man integrity and there he was — and I was thinking 'Oh my God.'"

The actor portrays a much different man, at a different time in his life, "this revolutionary warrior. Inside is the element of having to trust certain people and then being betrayed — that's just seismic."

The betrayer is Daniel Domscheit-Berg, once Assange's right-hand man. He's played by Daniel Brühl, one of Cumberbatch's close friends (who has a breakout role of his own this fall in "Rush"). That friendship worked to create a great on-screen chemistry as they weathered WikiLeaks storms. It also helped on Cumberbatch's difficult days.

One of those days was a scene at a press conference when Assange is under attack. There were nearly 400 extras. "It was terrifying, having rehearsed it for weeks, still with stops and stumbling, having to do it again and again."

It's not always like that. "There are days when you find the sweet spot, you might be hanging upside down and stark naked, but everything's placed right, you're in the zone. It's very empowering, but fleeting. The minute you think of it, it's gone."

Whether or not Cumberbatch feels it, the performances look as if he's mostly in the zone. The BBC's acclaimed "Hawking" made for remarkable watching as the actor captured both the vibrant mind and the failing body of the theoretical physicist. Or Christopher Tietjens in "Parade's End." Written by Tom Stoppard and currently up for five Emmys, including lead actor in a miniseries or movie for Cumberbatch, he plays a man in a class war of a very personal nature, torn between his nasty socialite wife and his sweet suffragette lover.

Of all his characters, Tietjens is the one Cumberbatch says he wishes he were more like. "He's a very good man. I've thought a lot about his goodness, I really got under his skin."

Though "12 Years a Slave" truly belongs to Chiwetel Ejiofor as Solomon Northup, the freeman sold into slavery, Cumberbatch has a meaty role as slave owner William Ford. By Northup's own account, Ford was a decent man. His slaves were better cared for, beaten less and he could be compassionate. Though not enough to keep a mother and her children together. That's a fine line to walk, but Cumberbatch does it by shouldering Ford's shame. We see it, feel it.

In "August: Osage County," he's playing rather a mess; tears and self-recrimination come easily to "Little" Charles Aiken. But on set on "Osage" he found a model for the kind of career he hopes to have: Meryl Streep.

"I love what I do, and as long as the variations in characters are there and I'm still learning and progressing. It's great to have the freedom to play the entire orchestra. I saw that working with Meryl Streep …," his voice trails off, then a quick smile. "I think I've got lots of learning to do."

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Miér Sep 11, 2013 7:21 pm

Mertxines escribió:
The betrayer is Daniel Domscheit-Berg, once Assange's right-hand man. He's played by Daniel Brühl, one of Cumberbatch's close friends (who has a breakout role of his own this fall in "Rush"). That friendship worked to create a great on-screen chemistry as they weathered WikiLeaks storms. It also helped on Cumberbatch's difficult days.

Really??????!!!!!! Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked 
Uissss que si fuera cierto que se han hecho amiguitos del alma, algo de España le va a ir llegando Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Jue Sep 12, 2013 12:16 am

Artículo sobre Benedict en el TIFF de The Telegraph (7-9-13):

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Benedict Cumberbatch interview: 'Star Wars? We’ll wait and see'

As Benedict Cumberbatch arrives at the Toronto Film Festival, he talks about playing Julian Assange - even after Assange asked him not to, Star Wars, and being a heartthrob.

It’s been a long night but Benedict Cumberbatch is up early and looking fresh and alert. This is thanks in part to a make-up man who is in attendance to make sure his hair is combed and slicked down and he looks his best for a day of interviews, photographs and greeting the fans who follow him everywhere.

The previous evening, shortly after his arrival from London, he walked the red carpet on the opening night of the Toronto Film Festival and faced a phalanx of photographers for the premiere of The Fifth Estate, in which he plays WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. It was the first of many such public parades awaiting him during the next few days. Although he is an old hand at red carpets by now he still manages to sound boyishly enthusiastic.

“The red carpet was incredible,” he says. “It was a very long press line after I’d had no sleep and was feeling jet-lagged so it was quite extreme. But I’m thrilled and it’s an embarrassment of riches. I’ve never been here before as a punter let alone to be participating in three films, so I’m very thrilled.”

Because of the three films having their premieres at the festival the 37-year-old actor is among the most in-demand stars in the city. The Fifth Estate, Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave, in which he plays a guilt-stricken slave owner, and August: Osage County, in which he co-stars with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts as a family black sheep, are all being talked about as possible Oscar contenders. But it is The Fifth Estate, a film that reignites the public debate over secrecy, security and whistle-blowing in the Internet era, which is currently commanding most of the attention and festival buzz.

Based on a book by Assange’s former partner, Daniel Domscheit-Berg and directed by Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters, Dreamgirls), The Fifth Estate was made in the face of strident opposition from Assange himself who, in a brief exchange of emails, pleaded with Cumberbatch not to associate himself with it. “He reached out to me and said he didn’t want me to do it and couldn’t condone it because he said the book and source materials we’ve based the movie on were poisonous and hazardous to his situation,” says Cumberbatch when we talk in a Toronto hotel room the morning after the premiere. “I wrote back trying to justify why I thought it was important to bring this version of events to the world and how it wasn’t as negative as he feared it would be.”

The Fifth Estate tells Assange's story from 2007-2010 and ends with Bradley Manning’s leaking of the classified US military files.

“At first I panicked about how on earth I was going to do this because there was so much to take on - vocally, physically and just confronting the full import of the story,” says Cumberbatch. “I did a lot of soul-searching. Reading the source material books was exciting but because Julian despised the people who wrote them I went to other material, including interviews he had given.

“It was important to me to try and humanise him and paint as three dimensional a portrait as possible. I didn’t want to portray him either as a villain or a hero. He is incredibly well informed and has great integrity. Whatever you think of him, for him to devote his life to a cause he believes in is pretty phenomenal.”

Cumberbatch talks quickly, quietly and eloquently, and has appealing, self-deprecating sense of humour. He is smartly dressed in a dark suit, white shirt and tie with a white handkerchief tucked into the top pocket of his jacket. “The suit’s a bit long in the arms and legs,” he says half-apologetically. “I feel like I’m wearing a train.”

He was Condon’s first and only choice for the Assange role because, says Condon, “Benedict is an actor we still want to know more about and that’s so appropriate for Julian Assange.”

An ever-growing army of female fans, who call themselves “Cumberbitches”, would like to know more about him, too.

He is amused at the attention his looks are attracting, particularly in America, where he is rapidly becoming a heartthrob thanks to the Sherlock Holmes television series and his attention-getting role as the villainous Khan in JJ Abrams’s Stark Trek Into Darkness. “It’s interesting and it’s something I’m processing,” he says of the attention. “It’s new to me and I’m sure I’ll get used to it and find a way of dealing with it. I’m not uncomfortable with the way I look and I find it kind of amusing. I’m very flattered by it but it’s, you know... amusing.

“But I was a little disturbed when I heard about the Cumberbitches because I think they set feminism back a few years.”

Unattached after splitting with girlfriend Anna Jones following a 12-year relationship with Olivia Poulet, he likes to keep his private life closed to outsiders and avoids talking about girlfriends. “I draw the line about answering questions like that,” he says with a polite smile. “I’m not a commitment-phobe and I was in a relationship for 12 years. But am I in a relationship now? Not right at the moment.”

The man with the unlikely marquee name, Benedict Timothy Carlton Cumberbatch, was born in north London to British actors Timothy Carlton and Wanda Ventham, both of whom had long and successful careers in movies and television.

“They worked incredibly hard and I was very spoilt,” he says matter-of-factly. “I had a good education and they sent me to Harrow, although they weren’t particularly moneyed. Mum did a lot of commercial theatre and farces in the Eighties and Nineties to make sure the school bills were paid.”

Initially Cumberbatch thought he wanted to become a lawyer, a choice his parents strongly supported. But they were not so happy when he decided instead that he wanted to follow in their footsteps and become an actor. “They wanted me to do a grown-up job and be a barrister, but they understood my decision and I was at university playing Salieri in Amadeus when my dad said to me, ‘You’re better than I ever was or ever will be. You’ll have a good time doing this and I’m going to support you.’

“It was a huge thing for a man to say to his son and it was very humbling and moving and one of the reasons I get out of bed in the morning and try to do the best I can is to make them proud.”

After taking a year off to teach English in a Tibetan monastery he attended the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art and began appearing in stage productions and also landing guest starring roles in TV dramas such as Silent Witness and Cambridge Spies.

He starred in the TV biopic Hawking about the early days of physicist Stephen Hawking and appeared in the movies Atonement and The Other Boleyn Girl. Then, after a string of British films and TV projects, he became internationally known as Sherlock.

He continued to make waves with Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and after he appeared in Steven Spielberg’s War Horse, the filmmaker recommended him to Star Trek director JJ Abrams, who hired him on the strength of an audition video he did in a friend’s kitchen that was shot and sent with an iPhone.

For Cumberbatch it was his entry into the world of big-budget Hollywood blockbusters, although he is determined never to abandon smaller, independent projects. After filming his dual roles as the Necromancer and Smaug the dragon in Peter Jackson’s film adaptations of The Hobbit and with the three films premiering in Toronto behind him, he is about to begin filming The Imitation Game in which he plays World War 11 Enigma code cracker Alan Turing. Then he will play the 1920s Amazon explorer Percy Fawcett in The Lost City of Z, a role originally intended for Brad Pitt.

“It’s a brilliant script and Percy Fawcett was an incredible man - a pioneer and adventurer. The idea of portraying him excites and intrigues me,” he says.

There are persistent rumours that he is also in line for a starring role in Abrams’s new Star Wars film, but he insists that nothing has been offered to him - yet.

“Of course I’d love to do Star Wars and work with JJ Abrams again because we had such a good time on Star Trek,” he says. “But nobody has been cast and there are no offers out to anyone apart from the regulars who are returning. So that’s that rumour quashed.” Then he adds with a grin: “We’ll have to wait and see.”

As we talk, there are hordes of fans waiting for him outside the hotel, held back behind barriers. Actors less famous than Benedict Cumberbatch have had their heads turned by the trappings of celebrity but, he Cumberbatch is keen to keep it in perspective: “My family, my close friends and people I have known for a long time keep me grounded. They see me as I was then as well as what’s happening to me now. Because they knew me before all this -” he gestures around him - “they can see the insanity of it all. And I try to keep it balanced.”

The Fifth Estate is released on October 11

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Jue Sep 12, 2013 1:05 am

Mertxines escribió:
He's referring to Assange's parody of the Aussie pop singer — a YouTube sensation the moment it landed in late August. It features Assange in a mullet belting out the Farnham hit "You're the Voice." "There I was struggling to give the man integrity and there he was — and I was thinking 'Oh my God.'"
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Se que aquí no se ponen pero quiero dejar el vídeo a que se refiere Ben. El que hizo Assange para su candidatura en las elecciones de Australia, es que es increible. Esto le valió hasta un regaño del presidente de Ecuador.  A este parece que el encierro en la embajada le está pasando factura en la azotea. Surprised Surprised Shocked Shocked 

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Jue Sep 12, 2013 3:41 am

sherlockvictim escribió:
Mertxines escribió:
He's referring to Assange's parody of the Aussie pop singer — a YouTube sensation the moment it landed in late August. It features Assange in a mullet belting out the Farnham hit "You're the Voice." "There I was struggling to give the man integrity and there he was — and I was thinking 'Oh my God.'"
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Se que aquí no se ponen pero quiero dejar el vídeo a que se refiere Ben. El que hizo Assange para su candidatura en las elecciones de Australia, es que es increible. Esto le valió hasta un regaño del presidente de Ecuador.  A este parece que el encierro en la embajada le está pasando factura en la azotea. Surprised Surprised Shocked Shocked 
Yo lo vi ayer y me partía la caja, pero a ver, Assange canta bien, no desafina, y ha hecho una versión de un top hit australiano, "You're the voice" de John Farnham (canción ochentera que a mí me encantaba cuando salió, de hecho la tengo en el Ipod jejeje). O sea que es una canción mítica para Australia.
De todos modos, según tengo entendido, el resultado de las elecciones australianas no ha convencido nada de nada a la mayoría de sus habitantes...

Por si os interesa comparar, este es el video original:

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Assange utilizó esta mítica canción para hacer su versión, pero si leéis la letra veréis que lo que dice es lo que Assange promulga:

YOU'RE THE VOICE

We have the chance to turn the pages over
We can write what we wanna write
We gotta make ends meet before we get much older
We're all someone's daughter
We're all someone's son
How long can we look at each other
Down the barrel of a gun?

You're the voice, try and understand it
Make a noise and make it clear
We're not gonna sit in silence
We're not gonna live with fear

This time, you know that we all can stand together
With the power to be powerful
Believing, we can make it better
We're all someone's daughter
We're all someone's son
How long can we look at each other
Down the barrel of a gun?

You're the voice, try and understand it
Make a noise and make it clear
We're not gonna sit in silence
We're not gonna live with fear

Y como no me gusta ninguna de las traducciones que he visto por ahí, os pongo la mía propia:

TÚ ERES LA VOZ

Tenemos la oportunidad de pasar página
Podemos escribir lo que queramos escribir
Tenemos que poder salir adelante antes de hacernos más viejos

Todos somos la hija de alguien
Todos somos el hijo de alguien
¿Cuánto tiempo más tenemos que mirarnos unos a otros
por el cañón de una pistola?

Tú eres la voz, inténtalo y entiéndelo
Haz ruído y hazlo claramente
No nos vamos a quedar sentados en silencio
No nos vamos a quedar viviendo con miedo

Esta vez sabes que podemos estar unidos
con el poder para ser poderosos
creyendo en que podemos hacerlo mejor

Todos somos la hija de alguien
Todos somos el hijo de alguien
¿Cuánto tiempo más tenemos que mirarnos unos a otros
por el cañón de una pistola?

Tú eres la voz, inténtalo y entiéndelo
Haz ruído y hazlo claramente
No nos vamos a quedar sentados en silencio
No nos vamos a quedar viviendo con miedo

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Jue Sep 12, 2013 4:29 am

Artículo en The Hollywood Reporter del 9-11-13:

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The Confessions of Benedict Cumberbatch

The cover star of The Hollywood Reporter's New A-List issue -- who stars in four movies this fall, including awards contenders "August: Osage County" and "The Fifth Estate" -- reveals how he was abducted at gunpoint, what he thinks about "Star Wars" rumors and the spotlight: "Is he gay? Can't he commit to a relationship? All this speculative shit."

I am 45 minutes into an interview with Benedict Cumberbatch, and frankly, it's not going well.

The English actor, 37, sits hunched within a tiny trailer, his gaunt frame swathed in modern-day Sherlock Holmes regalia, his preternaturally blue eyes alert to danger. He scorns media encounters of this ilk, especially when they wrench him from the set of his BBC series Sherlock, today being filmed at a Ministry of Defense base near Cardiff, Wales.

The rat-tat of guns peppers the air as real British soldiers prepare for possible war; turmoil in the Middle East days earlier prompted Cumberbatch to scrawl a note for his posse of paparazzi, bidding them, "Go photograph Egypt and show the world something important." But now his mind is reluctantly on something else: this interview.

We've hopped from one subject to another -- from his new movie, The Fifth Estate (in which he plays WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange); to his schooling at Harrow, one of Britain's leading private schools; to his teenage love affair with the theater. The questions have been all over the place, and so have the answers. The actor rightly has accused this reporter of "zigzagging." I, in turn, have suggested he obfuscates in his answers.

"You're saying that I'm using hollow symbols, which I'm not," he says.

Me: "I didn't say, 'hollow symbols.' "

Cumberbatch: "Well, 'obfuscate' is a distraction from truth."

Me: "It doesn't go that deep into truth."

There's an uncomfortable silence.

We agree to go back to the beginning, and curiously, everything changes. Suddenly, Cumberbatch is present and alert, as if Holmes' prickliness has peeled away, revealing a far more tender and emotional person as he relives the greatest trauma of his life, when he was abducted nearly a decade ago and held at gunpoint.

"We were in South Africa, in KwaZulu-Natal, this amazing district north of Durban," he recalls of the night when he and two friends drove back to the set of the 2005 miniseries To the Ends of the Earth after a weekend spent diving. "It was cold, and it was dark. I felt rotten. We were wary because that's a notoriously dangerous place to drive. Then, poof, the front-right tire blows. So we got the spare, but that meant getting all of our luggage out. We were like sitting ducks, adverts for -- not prosperity necessarily but materialism."

As the friends removed the tire, six armed figures emerged from the dark. "They were like: 'Look down! Look down! Put your hands on your heads! Look at the floor!' And they started frisking us and said: 'Where's your money? Where's your drugs?' -- we had smoked a bit of weed -- 'Where are your weapons?' And at that point, this adrenaline of fight or flight just exploded in my body. I was like, 'Oh f---, we're f---ed!' "

Tears spring into Cumberbatch's eyes as he recounts every petrifying detail, explaining how the abductors drove him and his friends off and then, when the actor protested that his bound limbs were losing sensation, yanked him out of the car and threw him in the trunk. Finally, they came to a halt in the middle of nowhere and tossed Cumberbatch on the ground. Deep into the night, he remained in terror. "I was scared, really scared. I said: 'What are you going to do with us? Are you going to kill us?' I was really worried that I was going to get raped or molested or just tortured or toyed with in some way, some act of control and savagery."

Eventually, without explanation, the assailants let their prey go, slinking off into the night, after which Cumberbatch rediscovered the sheer wonder of being alive. "It really, really enriches your values in life," he says. "It's incredibly important."

Then the prickliness returns, and he lambasts me as one of "you guys" (i.e., journalists) who probably won't add how moving it was when a pair of hands -- a complete stranger's -- reached down to save him. "I looked into this black man's face, and I cried with gratitude," he recalls before returning to what he said about enriched values. "F--- it. If that's a cliche, I don't care." Benedict Cumberbatch is nothing if not complicated.

Both highly intellectual and intensely emotional, he has faced death yet puts his life at risk through his passion for skydiving and high-speed motorcycling. Pursued by women, he remains single and in some ways a loner, though he spent years in a relationship with British actress Olivia Poulet, whom he met while a student at the University of Manchester.

At the flick of a switch, he can turn from icy to incandescent, from dignified to indignant. "He embodies the contradictions of Julian Assange," says DreamWorks partner Stacey Snider. "He is classical and modern, he is cerebral and intuitive, he attracts you and at times keeps you at a distance. That's what makes him singular and utterly compelling."

Cumberbatch speaks of being drawn to the "transcendent" and calls himself a Buddhist (at least "philosophically"), but he can just as easily leave all that, become Holmes and "imagine faking my own death."

He lives in a flat in north London, which he describes as both minimalist and eclectic ("I like light; there's not a single room in the house that doesn't have a window"). He watches some television, including Breaking Bad and The Killing, but not much. He professes a deep admiration for Stanley Kubrick, the subject of a dissertation he wrote at university about "how within a diverse subject matter his worldview is still very unified."

He has a fondness for music, particularly Icelandic band Sigur Ros: "It transports me. It gives me a mental landscape that is very inspiring. It gives me a space in my head where I can imagine great emotion and depth."

He seems both part of this world and removed from it, with an old-fashioned liking for books (he lavishes praise on Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End, the basis of an HBO miniseries for which he has received an Emmy nomination) and a contempt for the Internet, where vitriol "is horrific. You can't win. It's like a new form of bullying. I find it quite despicable."

Before he became an overnight Internet favorite following Sherlock's 2010 British debut to astonishing ratings (the first season aired on PBS in October 2010), Cumberbatch had seemed consigned to being an actor's actor, drawing praise for his portrayal of Stephen Hawking in a TV movie about the scientist and gaining notice for roles in such films as Atonement and War Horse. But he was catapulted to a different level of fame by his present-day take on Arthur Conan Doyle's creation.

Snider says he's at the top of DreamWorks' list for almost any project, other than a broad comedy. His astonishing ability to transform himself, along with his intense preparation (he even studied the violin before tackling Holmes), has made him one of the world's most admired actors.

But the requisites of stardom still seem alien to him, and he is dubious of his fan appeal, describing how odd it is to be surrounded by portraits of himself that fans have given him: "I've kept a couple that are stunning, that are just really beautiful drawings, and the rest I've had to give away. And I've told fans, 'Look, I'm very flattered, but what do you expect me to do with it? Think about it. Would you want your room surrounded by drawings of you?' It's a bit weird."

One of these fans got out of control and spied on Cumberbatch in his home from a nearby building, tweeting his actions as he took off his shirt and put on another. The experience shook him to the core. Coming to terms with it, he says, is "an ongoing process. To think that somebody knew everything I'd done in a day and told the rest of the world in real time!"

Add to that the actor's discomfort with female fans' self-definition as "Cumberbitches" ("Some of them have now called themselves the Cumbercollective; that's a slightly less offensive noun"), and it's hard not to think of Cumberbatch as a reluctant star, or one who has yet to reconcile his public and private lives -- lives that increasingly have become intertwined as the British media and Internet trolls scrutinize his every move.

"I'm not like Holmes," he says. "I don't have his capacity to compartmentalize." Cumberbatch adds, "I'm now haunted with, 'But he did want children, and now he doesn't? What's gone wrong? Is he gay? Can't he commit to relationships?' All this speculative shit. There's a point where I just go, 'I've said all I have to say.' "

If Holmes put Cumberbatch on the global map, it is Assange -- the subject of The Fifth Estate -- who might consolidate his stardom, with the role coming only months after his acclaimed turn as the villain in Star Trek Into Darkness.

Cumberbatch heard about the part "at someone's birthday party. I stepped outside, and both my agents [he's repped in Hollywood by UTA's Billy Lazarus] were sort of going, 'Woo-ooo! Really exciting news!' And I said, 'What? What?' I had no idea. And they said, 'DreamWorks would like to offer you Assange.' "

While preparing, he did everything to reach Assange. Although they never met in person, the two did communicate, via "e-mail through a friend, basically," explains Cumberbatch, wary of divulging the details. "He was pretty keen for me not to do the film, and the rest is sort of between us, really."

He seems sympathetic to the man who has been vilified in the Western media and who is now living inside the Ecuador embassy in London while Sweden attempts to extradite him on charges of sexual assault. "The thing is this: I have a profound respect for Julian," he says. "I also have a profound respect for the need of states to have a currency of secrets in order for Western democracy to exist and for fundamentalism to be defeated. And I don't think Julian is interested in fundamentalism triumphing."

Assange's interests, and actions, continued to play out in the media during the film shoot, which largely took place in Belgium early this year. "When you're playing someone who's in the eye of the storm, you suddenly become incredibly conscious of that particular world, those particular concerns," says Cumberbatch. "And the news kept crashing in about [WikiLeaks source Pfc. Bradley Manning]. There was this static in the air all the time."

And not just static, says director Bill Condon: "You had this extraordinary situation for an actor in the last few days of rehearsal, where he is channeling Assange at the same time as the real Assange is begging him to drop out of the film. You can imagine what pressure that put on him. But he handled it with remarkable grace and tenacity."

Cumberbatch grew up middle-class in London but attended Harrow. His parents wanted him to be a barrister, though they are actors; instead, their son fell in love with the craft while backstage at one of mother Wanda Ventham's plays. Instead of plunging into acting when he left Harrow, however -- and before studying drama at Manchester -- he spent months teaching in a Tibetan monastery.

"It was very lonely at times but also inclusive," he says. "There was this incredible experience of just for the first time properly thinking, 'Oh my God! There's so much going on in there.' " Cumberbatch still meditates, but "10 minutes every other week, practically. It's very sporadic. But I do still try."

It's unclear what direction Cumberbatch's career will follow outside Sherlock, for which he's committed to another season after the current one (he claims he does not know how long he'll continue beyond that). Regardless, he seems poised to become one of Britain's most memorable actors.

He's had his tentpole movies, with Star Trek and a voice part as Smaug in Peter Jackson's Hobbit trilogy, while continuing to embrace smaller, character-driven projects. He appears in 12 Years a Slave (which screened in Toronto, to rave reviews, along with Estate) and The Weinstein Co.'s August: Osage County. In the former, he plays a sympathetic slave owner; in the latter, the bullied son of Chris Cooper.

Although his work on 12 Years was fleeting, director Steve McQueen was impressed. "There's a dignity to him, a correctness," he says. "He's a real gentleman, and there aren't a lot of them about. There's also a Britishness to him that is very old-fashioned, and I don't mean in a stuffy way -- in a real, welcoming way. We haven't seen people like that in a long time."

Cumberbatch says he'd like to appear in a feature film that Gary Oldman is planning to direct but is circumspect regarding questions about the next Star Wars film, despite rumors that he will join its cast: "I don't know. Who knows, who knows? Nothing is known of that. I worked with J.J. [Abrams, who directed Star Trek Into Darkness and now is prepping Episode VII]. Obviously, he knows. Everyone who wants to be part of that film, they know about."

He is adamant that Star Wars had nothing to do with his recent decision to pull out of Guillermo del Toro's Crimson Peak. "Absolutely not. No, no, no, no. That was nothing to do with it at all. [It was] between me and Guillermo, to be honest. It was amicable, and that's all I'm going to say."

Questions like these are likely to dominate Cumberbatch's life for the foreseeable future. Whether he is ready to answer them is another matter.

If he wants to be a major star, he may have to, like it or not. And right now, Cumberbatch seems torn about the future, ambivalent toward the lure of stardom and more drawn to the less ephemeral.

"Sometimes as an actor you're looking for the infinite," he says. "If you can hold that, if you can remember that in the chaos, [it will] anchor you and give you grace and ease."

This is the better half of Cumberbatch, the part that makes him appealing. But then his defensiveness returns.

As he heads back to the set, where he has just days to wrap Sherlock before flying to Toronto for the Fifth Estate screening, he reminds me bluntly not to leave out the end of his experience in South Africa, when that stranger came to his aid.

"Everything has to be reduced [in an article]; that's the nature of it," he says. "But don't tell me, after I've given you all of this, that that's not important to you, and it won't end up in the story. Because that means a lot to me. You know?"



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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  sherlockvictim el Jue Sep 12, 2013 5:19 am

Gracias Merxines por la traducción de la canción.  Y sí, el video es muy divertido, la canción está muy bien y él canta muy bien (¿de verdad será su voz?). La cuestión es que da una imagen muy de "cachondeo" en plan Tu cara me suena, sobre todo en su situación y para hacer campaña política.  
Si aquí un candidato se pusiera a hacer su campaña de esa manera ¿tú te lo tomarías en serio? porque yo no, aun simpatizando con sus ideas.
(Esto último no ha sido una buena comparación porque la política nacional se ha convertido en un relajo....)
A eso me refiero, la imágen que da no es muy seria y creo que a eso se refiere el nene, también

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Jue Sep 12, 2013 8:48 am

A ver,2 cosas:
Primera:¿pero el Assange este bebe la leche caducada o qué coño es esto?Yo no sé que pasa con la gente que pierde el Norte cosa mala.¿No se dá cuenta que haciendo estas chorradas pierde la credibilidad y simpatías que había logrado?Me parece genial que el presidente de Ecuador le halla llamado la atención,o sea él dándole asilo y plantándole cara a medio mundo para mantenerlo ahí y el otro haciendo chorradas de adolescente descerebrao¡Hombre Julian¿es que no has aprendido nada de lo que te ha pasado,tío? Crying or Very sad ¡Qué decepción!Sad 
Segunda:Me ha encantado la entrevista esta última del nene y como le ha plantado cara al periodista y como se nota que el tío ya está hasta los huevings de todo el cotilleo y la basura que se levanta  a su alrededor.Me ha gustado que diga que le gusta la luz y que en su casa no hay ninguna habitación sin ventanas...sunny sunny ¡Claro ,si es un solete! flower  


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Y cuando el periodista comenta que al narrar su secuestro se le asoman lágrimas a sus ojos me ha dejao ya para el arrastre,por no hablar de la "advertencia final"de que ponga eso en su entrevista porque es importante para él¡qué gran hombre ! I love you 
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Nota off-topic:estoy escuchando al grupo este que le gusta al Bene(Sigur Rós )y es la mar de relajante,no me extraña que diga que le transporta  Very Happy 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Jue Sep 12, 2013 10:57 am

Cada vez que cuenta o habla de su secuestro me mata bien muerta. Es una experiencia muy intensa, pero es que él es muy intenso contándola, supongo que en cierto modo le ayuda a vivir con ello o a enfrentarse a ello.
No sé, no puedo explicar lo que pasa por mi cabeza cada vez que lo leo, no soy tan buena como él expresando depende que cosas.
Es solo que me hace sentirle muy cercano, las sensaciones que cuenta en realidad son muy íntimas, pero ahí está abriéndose de par en par, me parece impresionante. No me extraña que diga que es importante para él, es que de verdad lo es.
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Romelay el Dom Sep 15, 2013 3:06 am

Dejo por aquí un articulillo que he dejado en Cumberland también!! ^^


Benedict Cumberbatch arrives nearly an hour late for our scheduled interview during TIFF, but then we should have expected this, shouldn’t we?

He was, after all, extremely busy as the “It Boy” of TIFF 2013, appearing in three of the most talked-about films at the fest: gala opener The Fifth Estate, and Oscar hopefuls 12 Years a Slave and August: Osage County.

Cumberbatch, 37, shared TIFF “It Boy” status with fellow British actor Daniel Radcliffe, who also had three films at the fest. The Star christened the pair “Brit Boys” in a headline.

“I’m very flattered by that,” Cumberbatch says. “Just because I’ve got 10 years on Daniel. I’d be a Brit Boy any time you’d like.”
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Being an It Boy or Brit Boy comes with important duties big and small, it seems. Cumberbatch had barely seated himself at the chair and side table he was using for his Toronto interviews (which, oddly, resembled a home rec-room version of the Enterprise bridge on Star Trek) when a man came out of nowhere carrying a plain white dinner plate.

He wanted Cumberbatch to autograph it with black marker, which the actor cheerfully did.

But to get back to why it should come as no surprise that Cumberbatch was so late for his interview, we need to recall something he told The Independent newspaper in 2008.

Asked to finish the sentence, “A phrase I use far too often is . . . ” he replied: “‘Sorry I’m late!’ I’m a terrible timekeeper.”

He said this back when he was getting good notices for having portrayed physicist Stephen Hawking in the BBC drama Hawking. It was still some time before his current superstardom playing Sherlock Holmes in the BBC-TV series Sherlock, launched in 2010, and his more recent acclaim as the super villain in Star Trek Into Darkness and the scorching dragon Smaug in the coming The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug.

And that’s only a fraction of his current projects, with rumours of a Star Wars prequel/sequel in the mix.

So we shouldn’t be surprised about the lateness, should we? And Cumberbatch is indeed apologetic. It seems he nipped outside the interview room in the Ritz Carlton Hotel for a quick ciggie and respite from the mayhem.

“Sorry, it’s my first TIFF and I am so busy I can’t even see one of the films I’m in,” he says.

I remark at how relaxed he looks, considers how in-demand he is.

“I just got some fresh air; it does wonders for you getting out of a hotel room. But yeah, I look all right. I’m doing OK.”

With Holmesian acuity I observe that he’s wearing brown slacks, a blue denim shirt, a white striped summer sport coat and striped canvas sneakers, sans socks.

I further note with alarm that his hair is a dark reddish-brown, not at all like the “naturally blond” hue I had described in an earlier Star article. I had committed the journalistic sin of assuming it was his natural colour, because I’d seen it that way onscreen many times, including The Fifth Estate, due in theatres Oct. 18, in which he plays notorious WikiLeaks whistle blower Julian Assange.

Describing Cumberbatch as a “natural blond” brought me under sniper fire from his many fans on Twitter. Several of them indignantly scolded me, telling me that the lanky actor’s real hair colour is red, or “ginger” as the Brits call it.

“Well, you can sling s--- back at them,” Cumberbatch says with a wry smile, rising to my defence. “I’m not ginger.”

Cumberbatch begins to elaborate, while the four publicists/assistants seated behind him look up from their iPhones and iPads with amused interest.

“I’m auburn and there is a difference,” he says firmly.

“I’ve got very good friends and relatives who are ginger and trust me, there’s a difference. And they ain’t ever gonna see the proof! They might say, ‘We saw it when you were the Creature in Frankenstein!’ (a stage play in which Cumberbatch appeared nude), but they didn’t, they didn’t! The Creature in Frankenstein had darker hair than me.

“That was one of the oddest moments of my life, applying makeup to that particular part of my body, but I have hair that is auburn. It’s got streaks of red in it, definitely. It’s also got streaks of bronze and lighter colours and darker brown colours. When I was a kid I was as blond as the young Julian in our film.”

Such precision is what you’d expect of the man who plays Sherlock Holmes, who can deduce a man’s entire life story from the ashes of his cigar. It could also describe, conveniently enough, the nitpicky ways of Assange, the Aussie computer boffin and muckraker who stunned the world (and terrified many world leaders) in 2010 when WikiLeaks, in cahoots with several major newspapers, dumped thousands of secret U.S. military and government documents into the public domain.

Cumberbatch reached out to Assange before portraying him in The Fifth Estate (which he does very well), but Mr. WikiLeaks was having none of it. Assange was also not inclined to broach any discussion about the subject, perhaps because he’s still living under diplomatic asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, still potentially facing legal charges in the U.S. and Sweden.

“I wanted to meet him, but he didn’t want to meet me,” Cumberbatch sighs, adding that he was turned down in writing, not verbally.

“I haven’t spoken to him. He didn’t want to condone a film that he felt was based on two poisonous accounts of events that might be detrimental to him and his institution and people, including some who are awaiting trial and possible extradition.

“I respected that, but at the same time as politely as he wrote to me, I returned to him and said, ‘I thoroughly disagree. This is a good thing; we want to portray you in all your glories. It’s not about vilifying you. It’s not about demonizing you. It’s not about making you into a hero, but it’s about trying to explore the complexities of it and it’s a film, not a documentary.’”

Cumberbatch’s normally perfect diction suddenly seems muffled. He sheepishly removes the maple sugar hard candy he’s been sucking on.

“Sorry, this is a really good sweet! Sorry if it’s making my diction s---!”

Despite behind turned down by Assange, Cumberbatch still felt he needed to do right by the man, by showing him as more than just a humourless Internet troublemaker.

“I really profoundly wanted to show someone in private who had an emotional context, a sense of humour and the three-dimensionality which he can’t allow himself to show. I think that’s not because of being self-serving and protective, but because he doesn’t want to get in the way of the message.”

I point out to Cumberbatch that he’s not unlike Assange in his current state of notoriety. Everything the two of them say and do is under constant scrutiny, and they’re both caught in a whirlwind of media attention.

Cumberbatch keeps up a work schedule that would wear out three actors, perhaps making up for lost time over those years when he was a struggling unknown — such as when his film Starter for 10 played TIFF in 2006 and he wasn’t deemed important enough by the filmmakers to warrant an air ticket to Toronto for the fest.

How does he keep it up?

“Good diet and sleeping every now and again helps,” Cumberbatch says, grinning.

“I’ve got friends who keep me really grounded and for me — I guess in a way like Julian, although in a more flippant context — it’s about the work. So if the work is being celebrated, then all the other hoopla around it is nice, but it’s peripheral to the work.

“I’m in a really lucky position as well. I’m aware that not only is it an embarrassment of riches to have this many films at this festival, and ones with quality roles, but also that I’m actually employed at all. It’s a blessing in my industry. We’re oversubscribed and there are too many talented people who aren’t employed.”

I ask him if there any other real persons, alive or dead, whom he aspires to play in a film one day.

“Many, yes, but I’ve had quite a run on real figures, so it’s tricky to say no when they are as difficult and complex and rich and varied as the ones I’ve been asked to play, because I think that’s what draws all of us to their stories. They’re the extremes of humanity and that’s very interesting to watch and try and do.”

What he really longs to do, perhaps not surprisingly after the run of dark characters he’s been essaying, is to sing and dance.

“I’d like to play someone who can sing and dance. I’d like to do that. I’ve not done a musical. I’d also like to play a romantic comedy . . . there’s lots more stuff I’d like to do.”

Hmmm, perhaps he could combine the two, and do a biopic on Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire?

With Benedict Cumberbatch, as with Sherlock Holmes, no deduction is too wild to consider.



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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Dom Sep 15, 2013 12:51 pm

Artículo en "The Guardian" del 14-9-13:

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The peculiar charm of Benedict Cumberbatch

Sherlock Holmes made him an unlikely superstar. Now Benedict Cumberbatch is taking on Julian Assange in The Fifth Estate. He talks about email warnings from the WikiLeaks founder, his 'crush' on Matt Damon and why Chelsea Manning deserved her sentence

On 25 July 2010, two unrelated events took place in the space of 60 minutes that would change Benedict Cumberbatch's life for ever. At 9pm that evening, the BBC broadcast episode one of Sherlock. At 10pm, the Guardian, the New York Times and Der Spiegel published the first instalment of the Afghan war logs, courtesy of WikiLeaks.

Cumberbatch wasn't aware of the second event that night, because by then his name was trending on Twitter and his phone was going berserk. The actor was watching himself soar from respectable levels of critical acclaim into the stratosphere; Afghan war logs were the last thing on his mind. He'd never even heard of WikiLeaks or Julian Assange, and wouldn't discover what they would hold for him personally until more than two years later when his agent rang while he was at a friend's birthday party.

"I remember it really clearly," he says. "I had to go into the stairwell to try to get better reception. I heard them say, 'These people are really interested in offering you this part playing Julian Assange.' There was a TV series idea kicking around at the time, and I thought that was it, so I said, 'Great, I didn't realise that series was going ahead.' They said, 'No, it's DreamWorks.' 'DreamWorks are doing a film about Julian Assange!?' 'Yeah, and they want you to do it.'"

By then Cumberbatch was on the sort of roll every actor dreams of. Before Sherlock, he'd been a slightly odd-looking character actor accustomed, he liked to joke, to "big parts in small films, and small parts in big films", having played Stephen Hawking, Van Gogh and William Pitt, as well as supporting roles in Atonement and The Other Boleyn Girl. His modern-day Sherlock Holmes, however, was a revelation: cold-eyed, impatient, fast-talking, like a human iPad with a hint of Asperger's thrown in. Steven Spielberg declared it the greatest on-screen Holmes ever. Since that first series, watched by nearly 10 million in Britain alone, Cumberbatch had starred in War Horse, Star Trek Into Darkness and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, won an Olivier for his performances in Danny Boyle's Frankenstein at the National, and been voted the sexiest man alive. But playing Assange is his biggest role yet.

In January, he flew out to Iceland to begin filming. The man he was to play had by then been under police guard in the Ecuadorian embassy for more than six months, and had ignored all requests by the actor to meet. The very day before shooting began, just as he was having the final tests for his wig and makeup, Cumberbatch received a 10-page email urging him not to make the film. It was from Assange.

"It was a very considered, thorough, charming and intelligent account of why he thought it was morally wrong for me to be part of something he thought was going to be damaging in real terms, not just to perceptions but to the reality of the outcome for himself. He characterised himself as a political refugee, and with [Bradley] Manning awaiting trial, and other supporters of WikiLeaks who have been detained or might be awaiting detention, and the organisation itself – all of that being under threat if I took part in this film."

Did he wobble? "Of course. The fact that it was coming from the man himself, the day before we started filming? Of course I would hear and feel the protests of the man I was about to pretend to be. I'm a human being."

Had Assange persuaded him to pull out, Cumberbatch would not now be looking at a likely Oscar nomination. I watched the film directly before our interview, and his portrayal is so convincing that at the end I felt a moment of genuine confusion and thought I was about to meet Assange himself.

In real life, Cumberbatch looks nothing like the WikiLeaks founder. He is also unlike any actor I've come across. We first met last summer, when he had just finished making Star Trek in Hollywood, and was brimming with the bouncy charm common to men enjoying a sudden inflation in their sexual currency. The vertiginous cheekbones, snub nose and slanted green eyes have had him famously likened to an otter, but Sherlock had transformed him into a pin-up, and he cheerfully admitted to making the most of it. When we meet again at the Toronto film festival, where The Fifth Estate has just premiered, he is surrounded by a circus of publicists, people with clipboards, stylists and whatnot, but the easy, unguarded friendliness has somehow survived. He is not the only successful actor to hold on to his good nature in the face of fame, but most are less interesting than the characters they play. You get an idea of why Cumberbatch isn't from his description of what he wrote in response to Assange's email: "I don't want to go into any great detail, but it took me four hours and the central thrust was: this is not documentary, this is not a legally admissible piece of evidence in a court of law, it's not going to alter perception in a way that is actually politically going to damage you at all. People who will come to see this film will be savvy enough to see it as what it is; it's a starting point, that should both provoke and entertain. It will be a talking point, but your life, your private life, your persona, is fatefully intertwined with your mission – it cannot not be now. And to be honest, I think the sort of general perspective on you is still echoing from the kind of character assassinations that began way back when, with the initial leaks, and that is now heightened by the accusations of sexual misconduct in Sweden, and so you're known as this white-haired Australian weirdo wanted for rape in Sweden who's holed up behind Harrods in some embassy. So the misinformation about you is already there.

"I said listen, this film is going to explore what you achieved, what brought you to the world's attention, in a way that I think is nothing but positive. I admit to doing work because I'm a vain actor. I want to be able to say, yeah, I'm playing a lead in a film. That's a huge career move for me. Yet I'm not acting in a moral vacuum. I have considered this, and whatever happens, I want to give as much complexity and understanding of you as I can."

If I were Assange, I'd almost certainly have thought, well, he would say that, wouldn't he? But the intellectual engagement must have been unmistakable and, though Assange may not have believed him, Cumberbatch was telling the truth.

The film begins in 2008, and follows the WikiLeaks founder's ascent from underground hacktivist to international terrorist, in the eyes of Washington, or swashbuckling cyberhero to his admirers. It focuses on the intensely complex and ultimately soured friendship between Assange and his righthand man, a German hacker called Daniel Domscheit-Berg, as well as his wary and ultimately fractured relationship with the Guardian. But it ends before the allegations of rape in Sweden saw him arrested, jailed and held under house arrest for a year, and before his flight to asylum and indefinite captivity in Ecuador's London embassy.

I interviewed Assange in the embassy last year, and there are moments in the film when it's hard to believe it isn't him on screen. Cumberbatch's performance doesn't so much evoke as inhabit his character, and the accuracy of the voice, physicality and mannerisms is uncanny. He captures Assange's extraordinary capacity to charm and beguile, to intoxicate and manipulate, while offering glimpses of his isolation.

When Cumberbatch first read the script, he worried that it cast Assange as some kind of cartoon baddie. "I think I may get my head bitten off by Disney for saying so, but everyone agreed with that." He immersed himself in research, reading endlessly and interviewing people who knew Assange, and gradually the script evolved into a more nuanced portrayal. His performance draws heavily on his research into Assange's childhood. "I know it's a Freudian cliche to go, 'Oh well, when I was a kid…', but, to be honest, it's so profoundly true with Julian. To have been a child in a single-mother relationship, being pursued around the country by an abusive stepfather who was part of a cult – to be taken out of any context where he could discover who he was in relation to other people – well, to then become a teenage hacktivist, and evolve into a cyber-journalist, to me makes perfect sense. And he's still a runaway today. I find that profoundly moving.

"He kept isolating himself. Every bridge he built, he burnt. And I understood why at times, because he is on a trajectory that's different from other people. And, because of that, he can't form those human relationships that other organisations have. And that is tragic."

Those who know Assange have often speculated that he might be on the autistic spectrum. Cumberbatch says he has no idea if that is true, but seems to suspect not. "The bridge-burning thing could just be circumstantial nurturing from what happened to him as a kid. How do you build trust when that's constantly been taken away from you?" He doesn't buy the theory that he's just a vain egotist, either. "Because you can counter that with, no, he's basically putting himself out on a limb for something he believes in, a rigid ideology, and that's uncompromising. That behaviour seems to be solipsistic, but that's because of what he's holding on to."

It's an ideology Cumberbatch subscribes to only up to a point. He opposed the war in Iraq, and marched with a million others against it in 2003. "And it was such an amazing day. Though kind of dominated," and he starts to giggle, "by the protester with the placard saying 'The Only Bush I Trust Is My Own', which always makes me laugh. But that was the only thing that does make me laugh, thinking back to that day. There was just the despondency of realising that it meant nothing." When he read the WikiLeaks reports in the Guardian in 2010, about what western troops were up to, he'd been horrified. "Death squads and civilian casualties and underarmed soldiers and strategic mishaps and the brutalisation of soldiers and the terrorising of civilians: the worst fears we had about that war just came flooding through, and I thought it was extraordinary."

But before Assange and his followers get too excited, Cumberbatch turns out to be decidedly ambivalent about what WikiLeaks and other cyber-whistleblowers such as Edward Snowden are up to. He is alarmed by the revelations of mass surveillance by the NSA and GCHQ, and doesn't like the idea of anyone reading his private emails – "It's none of your business" – but then adds, "Oh, but you might have stopped me from being killed on a tube I took last Wednesday. If they are saving lives, how can we say that's less important than civil liberties? You don't have any civil liberties if you're dead. Isn't it hypocritical to say, we should know everything about you as a government, but the government can't know anything about us?" Assange argues for total transparency for powerful institutions, and total privacy for individuals. "But if you are a private individual who's packing semtex to kill people and destroy what we know as democracy for political purposes, then you're more than just a private individual."

As for Bradley, now Chelsea, Manning, the young US army officer who leaked hundreds of thousands of war logs, diplomatic cables and other US state secrets to Assange and has just been sentenced to 35 years, Cumberbatch is sympathetic on a human level. "But he broke a law. He knew what he was doing." Manning has applied for a presidential pardon, but Cumberbatch can't see why Obama should grant it. "He did what he did out of a conviction that an alarm bell needed to be sounded. But his superiors might have been right to say to him, it's not your position to be worried about it within the hierarchy of the military organisation, which is why he had to be sentenced. He took an oath, and he broke that oath."

This sounds to me like the former public schoolboy in Cumberbatch speaking, though I hesitate to say so, because he is so weary of the peculiarly British critique that he is too posh to deserve success. His parents are both jobbing British actors, Tim Carlton (Minder, Bergerac) and Wanda Ventham (Only Fools And Horses), who scraped together just enough money to send their only son to Harrow, in the misguided hope that it would launch him into a more dependable career than acting. He had great fun at Harrow, but headed straight from there to drama school in Manchester, and is now stuck with a toff tag that the tabloids have made much of. When I ask him to name the most maddening misconception about him, he mutters, "I think the Daily Mail Online has covered just about every one of them."

The celebrity press are also having lots of fun with his bachelor status, managing to publish a new photograph and rumour practically every week featuring a new "mystery beauty". For 12 years his girlfriend was the actor Olivia Poulet, whom he met at drama school, and who played the Tory spin doctor Emma Messinger in The Thick Of It. The relationship ended in 2011, and Cumberbatch always gets quite cross at the suggestion that he dumped her after hitting the big time with Sherlock. He has often talked about wanting to become a father, but at 37 there is no sign of that yet.

Actually, it's entirely possible that he hasn't talked about anything of the sort. Cumberbatch has reached that level of fame where even the most throwaway remark is parsed for hidden meaning and rebroadcast to the world as a statement of the utmost importance. A recent one was a report that he had a crush on Matt Damon and was desperate for an introduction.

"I have to explain this whole thing about Matt Damon," he laughs. "I'm a big fan of his, I think he's great. I mention this in a phone interview, and the woman down the other end of the line goes," and he adopts a silly, high-pitched American accent, "'Really? Do you really like him? Really? Why?' I was like, 'Why? Well, um, because he's a really talented actor, he's done lots of great things in his life, I think he's great. It'd be great to meet him.' 'You wanna meet him?' 'Er, well, yeah, I mean, of course it would be great to meet him and hang out.' 'Well, we could facilitate it!' 'Oh, OK. Great. Do pass on that I'm a huge fan. It would be great to see him.'" He pauses to roll his eyes. "Next day: 'Benedict Cumberband's Bromance With Matt Damon!' You know," he laughs, "it's all that shit." Does it drive him mad? "Well, sometimes. But mostly amused, really. You can't get too tied up with it."

He doesn't think he's an infinitely better actor now than he was before Sherlock, when he didn't have to deal with this sort of crazed attention. "No, I think I've just been asked to do more. And the more you do, the more people trust that you can do." But it's a nuisance that's unlikely to go away soon: this year he'll appear in two more big films, August: Osage County and 12 Years A Slave, and he has also recently finished filming series three of Sherlock.

"I felt very sentimental on the last day of shooting, thinking, 'Oh, I've got to say goodbye to him again.' He's fucking hard work, always has been, but I love him, and I got sad that I wasn't going to see him again for a while." He won't reveal much about the new series, beyond a coy, "Well, there's a reunion that doesn't necessarily go to plan. And there's a bonding experience that throws Sherlock and Watson back together in a very firm way. And there's a new union as well, in the shape of a marriage, which Sherlock takes part in, so we see that."

Before he heads off to rejoin rehearsals for another film, The Imitation Game, in which he plays another real-life character, Alan Turing, I begin to ask one last question, but he's guessed it before I finish. Does he ever think, I say, that right at this very moment…

"He's still there? Yeah. I think about that a lot." Assange remains a fugitive in the Ecuadorian embassy, and Cumberbatch has often walked right by the window, wondering if he will ever get out.

"How is it going to play out? I don't know. It's conceivable that he'll still be there in 20 years' time, isn't it?"


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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Dom Sep 15, 2013 1:52 pm

Que entrevista más buena. Me ha gustado muchísimo Very Happy 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Lun Sep 16, 2013 4:52 am

A mí personalmente ,este párrafo me ha noqueado y me ha dejado flotando.Bene,yo te aprecio mucho pero a veces es que me dan ganas de darte unas collejas,¿estás hablando en serio,tío?  Shocked Question 




As for Bradley, now Chelsea, Manning, the young US army officer who leaked hundreds of thousands of war logs, diplomatic cables and other US state secrets to Assange and has just been sentenced to 35 years, Cumberbatch is sympathetic on a human level. "But he broke a law. He knew what he was doing." Manning has applied for a presidential pardon, but Cumberbatch can't see why Obama should grant it. "He did what he did out of a conviction that an alarm bell needed to be sounded. But his superiors might have been right to say to him, it's not your position to be worried about it within the hierarchy of the military organisation, which is why he had to be sentenced. He took an oath, and he broke that oath."


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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Lun Sep 16, 2013 6:13 am

Jeje mi boquita de piñón, aunque yo creo entender lo que quiere decir y estoy bastante de acuerdo, la verdad.
Pero bueno esto es politiqueo y este no es el lugar, que anoche ya solté yo mi burrada correspondiente y ahora me siento culpable....
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Nika el Lun Sep 16, 2013 6:55 am

A ver,es que a mí esas declaraciones me parecen totalmente incoherentes en él.Y resulta que ha mandado una nota ,porque mucha gente opina lo mismo que yo,y el topo ha hecho bien su trabajo otra vez y le han pitado los oídos,jejejeje Laughing :

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15 Sep 2013 5:19pm
44
In a note sent to the Guardian after publication of this story, Benedict Cumberbatch said:
"I feel my views have been misrepresented. Do I think Manning should be pardoned? Yes. Do I think that's likely to happen? Sadly no. Re Snowdon I said in the interview that the use of threats to life as a reason to erode civil liberties through intrusive government surveillance can also be as dangerous to democracy as the terrorism such actions claim to be preventing. This wasn't printed for some reason."
Ya me iba a tirar a la bebida Very Happy :
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Lun Sep 16, 2013 8:18 am

Uissss pues yo si le había entendido, por eso estaba tan extrañada con el revuelo. Supongo que por una vez y sin que sirva de precedente, mi inglés imperfecto en lugar de jugarme una mala pasada me ha hecho ver lo que dijo con otra perspectiva, porque yo no soy capaz de traducir todo, no entiendo todas las palabras o expresiones y traduzco generalizando y por el contexto. Creo que en esta ocasión me ha venido bien para captar lo que quería decir, eso y las mil entrevistas que llevo leídas del festival, en las que lleva repitiendo casi lo mismo desde el principio.
De todas formas el pobre se va a tener que limitar a hablar del tiempo y de lo que le gusta la competitividad en el dominó, porque siempre le sacan de contexto lo que dice.
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Lun Sep 16, 2013 9:00 am

lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! 

Me parto , luly no se si te acuerdas que la semana pasada estuvimos hablando de que las entrevistas de Ben no habian cambiado nada en los ultimos años , y yo dije que en algo si que habia cambiado que ahora se pensaba muy bien las cosas antes de decirlas para no cargarla como antes, pues se ve que el topo ya le ha ido con el "cotilleo" y para no darme la razon pues se ve que el niño tenia que decir algo jajajajajajajjaaj eso para que no digamos que a cambiado en nada ni en lo bueno ni en lo malo jajajajajajajajaajja , claro tanto tener a modelos de "amigas" es lo que tiene que la tonteria es contagiosa jajajajaj Razz Razz Razz Razz  , claro esto sera para no perder contratos en yankilandia por hacer de assange , eso si su amigüito se va a cabreaaar , sip sip Laughing Laughing 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Lun Sep 16, 2013 8:24 pm

Jo! pobre, es que el tema es peliagudo y es muy difícil dar una opinión al respecto sin herir sensibilidades de un lado o del otro. Demasiado que se ha atrevido a dar la suya y en este caso digas lo que digas va a estar mal para alguien.
Yo entiendo que las cosas no son blancas o negras, vamos que existe el gris y en varios tonos y a mi es lo que me parece captarle.  En esta ocasión de verdad no creo que haya dicho ninguna barbaridad, además es su opinión, no está pretendiendo sentar cátedra ni nada de eso y en cierto modo me fastidia que tenga que dar explicaciones, como persona puede pensar lo que le venga en gana.
Vamos que yo sigo diciendo lo mismo que últimamente, a mi me parece una persona muy valiente por decir lo que piensa, además no nos olvidemos que todo forma parte en cierto modo de la promoción de la película. En todo momento ha estado diciendo que Assange no es un héroe ni un villano, que la película lo presenta un poco para que cada uno piense lo que quiera.
Todo lo que rodea este tema hace que cada uno tengamos nuestras opiniones al respecto y estoy segura de que casi todo el mundo, por lo menos a mi me pasa, tenga opiniones encontradas y muchas dudas razonables. Lo bueno de todo esto es que por lo menos te hace plantearte cosas que si Assange no hubiera hecho lo que hizo, igual ni nos lo habíamos planteado.
Además me encanta la última frase de la entrevista en la que dice que este hombre está encerrado en la embajada y que puede que siga allí veinte años más... (Nota muy personal, no me parece justo habiendo otros "individuos", no entraré en detalles, que han hecho cosas peores y campan a sus anchas)
A mi últimamente me está haciendo pensar mucho, lo cual me agota uffff que esfuerzo Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz si yo de pequeña quería ser modelo ....
(Nota 1: Pobres modelos, no todas son tontas)
(Nota 2: Tenía que poner la nota payasa, que me estaba poniendo muy trascendental)
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Lun Sep 16, 2013 9:41 pm

Porsupuesto , estoy totalmente de acuerdo contigo en que cada uno puede tener su opinion faltaria mas , a lo que me queria referir es que este hombre para un pregunta que se puede responder con si o no , empieza hablar y hablar que cuando termina ni te acuerdas de lo que le habian preguntado Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes , y aqui podria haber echo eso digo para no que dar mal frente a ninguna de las partes , que en su profesion decir lo que se piensa es algo "peligroso" y despues hay que estar mandar notas de aclaracion que no deveria ser asi pero lo es Sad Sad Sad 
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  lulyve el Mar Sep 17, 2013 5:23 am

Os dejo la transcripción completa de la parte de la entrevista de "The Guardian" , que ha liado tanto revuelo.
Creo que con esto queda todo claro.
Lo sigo diciendo, pobrecillo acabará hablando solo del tiempo, de caballos y de la marca de té que bebe LaughingLaughingLaughingLaughing


On 15 September, the actor Benedict Cumberbatch wrote to the Guardian to say he felt his views had been misrepresented in an interview by Decca Aitkenhead published in Weekend magazine. His note has been posted under the article, and says: "Do I think [Chelsea] Manning should be pardoned? Yes. Do I think that's likely to happen? Sadly no. Re [Edward] Snowden I said in the interview that the use of threats to life as a reason to erode civil liberties through intrusive government surveillance can also be as dangerous to democracy as the terrorism such actions claim to be preventing. This wasn't printed for some reason."

We are happy to clarify any confusion about Cumberbatch's comments on Manning and civil liberties by publishing an unedited transcript of that section of the interview. Editor's note: the article's original standfirst, which said Cumberbatch "talked about... why Chelsea Manning deserved her sentence", misrepresented what Cumberbatch says in the interview: this was an editing error (headlines and standfirsts are not written by the interviewer) and has since been corrected online. We apologise for this mistake.

Decca Aitkenhead: How did you feel watching Manning's trial?

Benedict Cumberbatch: Awful. Cos he is a young man and he did what he did out of a conviction that an alarm bell needed to be sounded. The trigger-happy response is to mudsling and say he's a confused kid who doesn't know enough about his gender. I think that's separate from the fact that he was going to his superiors and saying, 'I'm worried about this.' But his superiors might have been right to say it's not your position to be worried about it within the hierarchy of the military organisation, which is why he had to be sentenced. He took an oath, and he broke that oath – he broke a rule he knew he was breaking. The tragedy is that he did it out of such a strong conviction. On a personal level, I really feel for the guy, it's a very, very severe sentence. But I understand why he had to be convicted, of course I do.

DA: Should he be pardoned?

BC: [Spreading upraised palms, and sighing] Phhh. As I said, he broke an oath, so he knows what he's doing. But he did it for good reason. Again, I think it's too black and white to say he should be pardoned. I just think the sentencing was harsh. But I understand why he was convicted. He broke a law. He knew what he was doing.

[With regard to mass surveillance and civil liberties]

BC: And now we've got revelations that our government organisations, the NSA and GCHQ, have been eavesdropping on private communications to root out terrorism and fundamentalism. But in doing that they've eroded civil liberties to an extent that we're answering fire with fire, and are we becoming Orwellian in our fundamental approach to fighting fundamentalism? It's kind of a terrifying circle to square. I'm not an intelligence expert. I don't want you looking at what I'm looking at on the internet, or knowing what my password is for Facebook or my bank account, or overhearing messages to friends and lovers, people I love and hate, it's none of your business. Oh, but you might have stopped me from being killed on a Tube I took last Wednesday. They're not going to be able to tell us exactly what is in that information. And that's a powerful thing for us to fear, because they can just say, well, we aren't going to tell you, but it's for your own good. They can always say that. My fear is how quickly it's all evolving, that's what worries me. It's just happening so quickly. I don't have an opinion about it, I don't think it's right or wrong.

DA: Don't you?

BC: If they are saving lives, how can you say that is less important than civil liberties? You don't have any liberties if you are dead. What I do feel is wrong is how quickly this is moving into legislation which can have a journalist detained at an airport in that horrible limbo between jurisdictions that is beholden to no international law. I'm only saying what everyone in your paper has already said. That's really worrying, that needs to be slowed down and debated. This is happening too quickly. Yet at the same time, Alan [Rusbridger, Guardian editor] as an editor has that – I'm not saying he's going to sell it – I trust him, I believe in his core principles. But I can understand why anyone would be fearful – like Laura Linney's character [in my new film The Fifth Estate] who has worked for years in intelligence communities would be nervous of the editor of a paper having that information. I'm not saying they're right, I'm just saying I can see their perspective.

I think transparency is really important, but should that transparency be transferred to our communications? Isn't it hypocritical to say we should know everything about you as a government, but the government can't know anything about us?

DA: Assange would say that's because you're a private individual.

BC: Absolutely. But if you are a private individual who's packing Semtex to kill people and destroy what we know as democracy for political purposes, then you're more than just a private individual in a democracy. My fear is meeting fire with fire, and I think that's what we're moving towards too quickly and we need to debate it.


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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Isadora el Mar Sep 17, 2013 6:50 am

Como trabaja la bien peiná Very Happy  , antes si lo criticaban no pasaba nada mientras hablasen de el todo bien , pero ahora ..no no no no , y si ademas es algo que ha dicho " a medias " con mas razon .
y la verdad ya estas declaraciones si parecen mas de Ben Very Happy , por que lo dicho este se enrolla dice mucho y no dice nada , ese si es mas su estilo , creo de verdad que este hombre hiba para politico jajajajajja Razz , y hay varias cosas que me han echo gracia lo de que no quiere que sepan lo que busca en internet Suspect Suspect  este busca lo que escriben sobre el todo lo que puede Suspect Suspect  , lo de la contraseña del facebook, ja!! lo pillamos ( que listas somos que sabiamos que tenia facebook , se llamara los curls que castigan ummm Suspect Suspect  jajaj Razz ) y lo de que no quiere que sepan lo que habla con sus amigos y... amantes!! anda que se corta jajajajjaajjaajja Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked ( vamos tampoco creo que fuesen conversaciones muy interesantes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes )  claro y despues no quiere que la gente hable de el Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes 

y ahora una cuestion trascendental... a quien odia este hombre??? Suspect Suspect  ahhh!! ya a la vieja el visillo de la vecina jajajajaj Razz
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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Spainlovecumberbatch el Lun Sep 23, 2013 12:01 am

Por aquí dejo un artículo de El País sobre Ben! Smile

EDITO: Cita de Cumberbatch en éste artículo: "La tercera temporada (de Sherlock) va a salir en el Reino Unido entre finales de diciembre y principios de enero del año que viene, esa es la información que tengo."

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

Mensaje  Mertxines el Lun Sep 23, 2013 4:47 am

Spainlovecumberbatch escribió:Por aquí dejo un artículo de El País sobre Ben! Smile

EDITO: Cita de Cumberbatch en éste artículo: "La tercera temporada (de Sherlock) va a salir en el Reino Unido entre finales de diciembre y principios de enero del año que viene, esa es la información que tengo."

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Spain! Veo que ya está puesto en la sección de Entrevistas, que es lo que realmente es...

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Re: Artículos de prensa sobre Benedict Cumberbatch

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